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Teaching Tuesdays, Spring 2012

DateTopicPresenters
Feb. 7
Assessment of writing with implications for teaching and learning (pdf)
This presentation was based on a four-year longitudinal assessment of Hunter’s required first year writing course. The presenters discussed their assessment process and results, including how Hunter’s writing curriculum and pedagogy have improved in response to this ongoing evaluation.
Trudy Smoke, PhD, Professor, English Department
Harriet Luria, EdD, Associate Professor, English Department
Feb. 28
Learning opportunities at the Reading/Writing Center (pdf)
Representatives from the Reading/Writing Center discussed the deeper issues behind student reading and writing challenges and the services they offer to help. The center provides tutoring in academic reading and writing to strengthen student skills in courses across the curriculum, from first year writing through graduate studies.
Dennis Paoli, PhD Coordinator, Reading/Writing Center, Co-Coordinator, Writing Across the Curriculum
Mar. 13
How do students do resarch-based assignments? (pdf)
What really happens between the time when you assign a research paper and when it is handed in to you by a student? Participants learned the results of a study of undergraduate scholarly habits at six CUNY colleges, including Hunter. Data gathered from interviews, photo surveys and mapping diaries revealed much about student writing and responses to research assignments, as well as students' experiences with and ideas about academic support.
Maura A. Smale, Assistant Professor, Library Department, New York City College of Technology
Mariana Regalado, Associate Professor, Library Department, Brooklyn College
Mar. 20
Making museum visits work (pdf)
New York museums are a great but underutilized resource for Hunter's faculty and students. Representatives from the Rubin Museum and Metropolitcan Museum of Art joined Hunter faculty to discuss how to make better use of museum collections and staff for enhancing classroom lessons. This event was held in conjunction with Hunter's Arts Across the Curriculum initiative.
Laura Lombard, Manager, University Programs, Rubin Museum;
Marcie Karp, Managing Museum Educator, Academic Programs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art;
Dara Meyers-Kingsley, Project Director, Arts Across the Currculum Initiative
Director, Muse Scholars, Hunter College;
Wendy Raver, Distinguished Lecturer, Religion, Hunter College;
Mar. 27 Strategies for engaging students in large classes (pdf)
How can peer instruction motivate learning? How can questions be designed to enhance class interaction and engage students on a deeper level? Theatre Professor Dongshin Chang discussed how his pedagogy changed as a result of designing and incorporating engaging questions into the classroom experience, while Physics Professor Neepa Maitra addressed using "peer instruction," in which students work in small groups to address conceptually difficult problems.
Dongshin Chang, Professor, Department of Theater
Neepa Maitra, Professor, Department of Physics
Apr. 3
Writing, discovery, and critical thinking: Creativity and student success
The presenters discussed their writing courses for graduate and undergraduate students at the Hunter–Bellevue School of Nursing. Formal assignments, including a blog post, a summary of qualitative research, and a narrative essay, are supplemented by artistic practices such as daily journal writing and in-class “quick writes” to encourage critical and creative thinking. Instructors meet with all students in one-on-one conferences twice a semester to discuss progress. While one stated intention is to help students sharpen their writing skills, another of equal importance is to enhance students’ sensitivity in their clinical practice.
Diana J. Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, Rudin Professor, Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing, Co-Director, Hunter College Center for Health, Media & Policy;
Joy Jacobson, MFA, Adjunct faculty, Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing
Poet-in-Residence and Senior Fellow, Hunter College Center for Health; Media & Policy
James M. Stubenrauch
, MFA, Adjunct faculty, Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing, Senior Fellow, Hunter College Center for Health, Media & Policy
Apr. 17 Pathways initiative and the Hunter common core
This event offered a moderated discussion about how to uphold Hunter's educational values and requirements while implementing the new Hunter Common Core, the framework for responding to CUNY’s Pathways initiative.
Christa Acampora, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy; Pam Mills, Professor, Department of Chemistry; Lisa Marie Anderson, Associate Professor Department of German
Apr. 24
Opening up the conversation: Sensitive topics in the classroom
With a diversity of identities becoming mainstream in popular culture, and now that same-sex marriage has been passed in New York, it's easy to think that gender identity and sexual orientation are non-issues. However, when sexual subject matter comes up in classrooms, the energy suddenly shifts. So what do you do? Professors Rupal Oza and Jennifer Gaboury shared their wealth of experience in teaching Gender Studies, including tips for opening up discussion and breaking down barriers when treating sensitive subject matter.

Rupal Oza, PhD, Director, Gender Studies Program
Jennifer Gaboury, PhD, Associate Director, Gender Studies Program 
May 1
The underbelly of academia: Should we teach these conflicts?
Is it a good idea to teach the conflicts in your subject area, or even between subject areas? In his book Beyond the Culture Wars, Gerald Graff gives an elaborate argument for what he calls “teaching the conflicts,” where he envisions all kinds of academic conflicts, including academic hierarchies and those over the culture wars. Graff suggests that these conflicts should be out in the open and taught in certain classes. This event offered an exploration of ways that conflicts can be used to further pedagogical approaches in any class.
Alan Hausman, PhD, Department of Philosophy