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Fall 2019

 

Fall 2019

Undergraduate Courses

 

ANTHP 101
Human Evolution
Fulfills Distribution Requirement Math Sci

 

This is an introductory course to the sub-discipline of physical anthropology.  The course focuses on the study of human origins and adaptation through an understanding of evolutionary mechanisms, genetics, primate biology, the fossil record and modern human variation. 

 

Section 1-Tues Thurs 5:35-6:50pm 415HW plus lab sections Professor Rothman

Section 2-Mon Thurs 2:45-4:00pm 1036HN combined with w/x-01 plus lab sections Professor Baden

 

ANTHP 105
The Human Species

Fulfills Hunter Core Life and Physical Sciences (LPS) GER 2/E

 

In this course, we examine human biology and behavior from an evolutionary perspective, comparing our anatomy, physiology, and behavior to those of living primates and other mammals. We will discuss the relative roles of genes (“nature”) and environment (“nurture”), the biological basis of behavior, and local biological adaptations evident in modern human populations. Students will also actively engage in the development of scientific hypotheses, data collection, and data synthesis analysis, as part of laboratory research experiences throughout the semester. Material covered will help prepare students to understand and evaluate recent advances in genetics, behavioral studies, medicine, and evolution.

Section 1-Tues Fri 10:10-11:00am 510HN combined with/ANTHP105 X-01 plus lab sections Professor Levy

  

ANTHP 210

Biology of The Living Primate

 

The objective of this course is for students to learn the taxonomy, life history, behavior and ecology of the living non-human primates through a survey of their diversity and focused readings of field studies.

Tues Thurs 4:10-5:25 pm 717HN Professor Rothman

 

ANTHP 306

Human Anatomy

The goal of this course is to understand basic human anatomy: know all of the bones, muscles, major nerves and vessels in the human body, how they work, and how they are organized (and why). 

 

TENTATIVE Tues Thurs 9:45-11:00 am 730HN Pugh

 

ANTHP 311

Primate Evolution

Weds 10:10-1:00pm 731B HN combined with ANTH 791.51 Professor Gilbert

 

ANTHP 401.77

Human Osteology

Human Osteology provides a thorough introduction to the human skeleton.  The majority of the course will deal with skeletal anatomy, bone development, fragment identification, and tooth identification.  In addition, the knowledge gained about skeletal anatomy will be applied to the field of forensic anthropology.  Interpretation of skeletal features and landmarks will be used for assessing age, ancestry, sex, and stature.  The interpretation of skeletal trauma will also be discussed.

Tues 5:30-7:20pm 730HN combined with ANTH 791.01 Professor Soler

 

 

ANTHP 401.79
Primate Conservation

This course will cover the science and ethical debates behind primate conservation. Humans are primates and, yet, our actions threaten the survival of many of our closest living relatives, nearly 50% of which are threatened with extinction. We will investigate the threats to wild primates and the strategies used to protect them. As other animal and plant species face similar threats, we will also rely on examples from beyond the primate world. *Note: This is a discussion-based course. It will be a mix of traditional lecture, class discussion, and guest lectures from experts in the field.

Mon 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTH 791.53 Professor Baden

 

ANTHC 100
Cultural Diversity in the US
Writing intensive; Pathways flexible CORE: US Experience in its Diversity

 

This course provides a critical introduction to principal theoretical perspectives on American society in its broad diversity, and includes historical and ethnographic materials that reveal broad trends in the cultural and social history of the United States.  Through comparative and critical review of a wide range of cases, from the foundation of the first European colonies in North America to the Civil Rights movement, we will learn how the American experience has been shaped by histories of settlement and migration; the contributions of indigenous communities, groups of migrants from different parts of the world, and social relations of slavery and inequality to that experience; and how historical struggles and legal and political innovations have crafted the fabric of American diversity.

Section 1-Tues Fri 2:10-3:00pm 415HW combined with/ANTHC X-01 plus discussion sections Jopling

Section 2-Mon Thurs 3:10-4:00 pm 615HW combined with X-02 plus discussion sections Professor Brown

ANTHC 101
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Pluralism & Diversity Group A

 

This course has three main objectives: (1) to provide an overview of key topics in cultural anthropology; (2) to encourage critical thinking about key anthropological and social scientific debates, past and present; and (3) to analyze explanations for, and causes of cross-cultural similarities and differences. We will attempt to understand both the universal process through which human beings constitute themselves through culture, and the great diversity of cultural forms that result. In the past, anthropologists usually studied distant and “foreign” peoples, the more different from “us” the better. We will look at this “we/they” dichotomy in the context of today’s increasingly interconnected world and explore what happens when anthropological tools are used not only to look at the “other,” but in the analysis of our own complex, diverse society.


Section1-Mon Turs 8:10-9:25am 714HW Professor Coleman

Section 2-Tues Fri 9:10-10:00am 510HN combined with w/X-04, HC1 plus discussion sections Professor Edelman

Section 3-Sat 11:10-2:00pm 510HN Professor Hodges

Section 4-Mon Thurs 1:10-2:25pm 511HW Professor Koga

 

 

ANTHC 10N01
Global Health and Culture

Global health has grown over the past several decades to become an important concept for thinking about health in overlapping international contexts. How can we best understand the historical, social, cultural, political, and economic forces that shape health in global contexts? How have processes of colonialism, urbanization, globalization, and neoliberalism influenced global health? How does the sub-discipline of medical anthropology use critical theory to critique the relationship between health and the capitalist world system? This course provides a critical introduction to principal theoretical perspectives and topical issues relevant to global health. In addition to scholarly texts, it presents ethnographic and journalistic materials that reveal broad trends and pressing concerns of global health. From the impact of the first European colonies in North America on Native American groups, to climate change and modern industrialization, to the role of global capitalism in the emergence of new infectious disease epidemics, we will compare and critically review of a wide range of historical and contemporary cases to understand how global health and culture intersect.

Mon Thurs 2:45-4:00pm 717HN Gerdes

 

 

ANTHC30N02
Grassroots Movements and Social Change

Mass mobilizations — both progressive and regressive — have been significant engines of historical transformation. This course examines social scientific theories about social movements, with a specific focus on racial, gender, peace and environmental justice, transnational and local, indigenous peoples, and cultural movements. 

 

Tues Fri 2:10-3:25pm 705HN Professor Edelman

 

 

ANTHC 30N03
Disability and Culture

This course will provide an introduction to central concepts, methods, and themes in the multidisciplinary and developing field of Anthropology of Disability. We will explore disability in a global context for comparative analysis, and within the U.S. situation as a starting point.

Tues Fri 3:45-5:00pm 705HN Professor Oliveira



ANTHC 126
Intro-Prehistoric Archaeology

Fulfills dist req soc sci for majors
Introduction to the methods of archaeology, and a survey of world prehistory from the earliest humans to the rise of the first civilizations.

Tues Fri 11:10-12:25pm 1036HN Professor Parry

ANTHC 127
Methods in Archaeological Sciences

Pathways flexible Core

Introduction to the theories and methods of field science in archaeology and paleoecology

Section 1- Tues 1:10-4:00pm 717HN Professor McGovern

Section 2- Weds 2:30-5:20pm 717HN Professor Hicks

Section 3- Thurs 9:45-12:35pm 717HN Sant Mukh

 



ANTHC 151
Introduction to Linguistics
Fulfills GER.

 

Introduction to the study of language from an anthropological perspective, starting from its most minute components, such as the phonemes, and finishing with the larger social context: how language is used to construct and preserve social inequality.


Tues Fri 12:45-2:00pm 511HW Professor Clementepesudo

 

ANTHC 215

Anthropology of Black America

This course critically examines ethnographic texts about Blacks in the United States, focusing as much on what they proffer about Black American culture as on the various socio-political contexts in which this body of scholarship has been produced. The goal is to advance an understanding of the larger social forces undergirding the production of knowledge about Black America, while also fostering a critical understanding of the anthropological enterprise itself.


Mon Thurs 1:10-2:25pm 717HN Professor Brown

 

 

ANTHC 303.50

Community Organization and Action

Fri 11:10-2:00pm C114HN

 

 

ANTHC 310.01
Politics of Memory

This advanced upper level undergraduate seminar explores the role of memory as a social, cultural, and political force in contemporary society. As evidenced not least by the recent confederate monument debate in the US, how societies remember difficult pasts has become a contested site for negotiating the present. Through the lens of memory, we will examine complex roles that our relationships to contested pasts play in defining navigating issues we face today. This seminar explores this politics of memory that takes place in the realm of popular culture and public space. The class asks such questions as: How do you represent difficult and contested pasts? What does it mean to make long-silenced victims’ voices to be heard? What are the consequences of re-narrating the past by highlighting past injuries and trauma? Does memory work heal open wounds of a society and a nation? Through examples drawn from the Holocaust, the atomic bombing in Hiroshima, the Vietnam War, and genocides in Indonesia and Lebanon, to the recently rekindled debates on confederacy statues, slavery, and lynching in the US, this course approaches these questions through anthropological exploration of concepts such as memory, trauma, mourning, silence, voice, testimony, and victimhood.

Mon Thurs 9:45-11:00am 705HN Professor Koga

 

ANTHC 314
Research Design in Anthropology


Fulfills GER Stage 3B
Introduction to basic principles of research design employed in anthropology

Tues Fri 11:10-12:25pm 717HN Professor Clementepesudo

 

 

ANTHC 315.50

Anthropology and Education

This course explores the relationship between anthropology and education. Anthropological perspectives on what is taught and learned, by whom, where, when and how. The course will review teaching and learning, from childhood through adulthood, in cross-cultural perspective, with an emphasis on what children [and adults] are taught, and how they learn. Current and classical research on the structure, function, and purpose of schooling and of non-formal education will be considered from the standpoint of the premises and values of contemporary American culture, viewed through the lens of anthropology.   

Thurs 5:30-7:20pm 717HN combined with ANTH 718.50 Professor Hodges

 

 

ANTHC 318/ANTH 703
History of Anthropological Theory


Required for Majors
Pluralism & Diversity Group D
Fulfills GER Stage 3B


This class is a selective, historical survey of anthropological theory. We will examine important theoretical accounts of human culture and society, covering works from the early twentieth century to the present, exploring how changing historical contexts, diverse fieldwork experiences, and philosophical trends have shaped the European and American development of sociocultural anthropology. This course particularly emphasizes the contributions of the anthropology of knowledge, political anthropology, and critiques of colonialism and of contemporary political economy. We will also seek to define the role that theories of culture, religion, power, gender, and history can and should play in a wider understanding of human beings as, at once, complexly social and complexly biological creatures. Ultimately we aim to gain a better understanding of how theories of the human, from universal "man" to "cultural diversity" to homo economicus, have shaped academic anthropology as well as their wider implications for contemporary life in society. This class meets once a week and will be conducted through seminar-style discussions; moreover, it is reading-and-writing-heavy. The reading load will average 100 pages a week (though readings each week will range in difficulty and length, from original theoretical analyses of particular ethnographic situations, to essays in intellectual history, to practitioner's reflections). There will be weekly reader-response papers, and the class will culminate in a final paper based on course reading.


Weds 5:30-7:20pm 717HN combined with ANTH 703.00 Professor Fierman

 

 

ANTHC 320.01

Gender and Migration

Tues Fri 11:10-12:25pm 604HW combined with WGSL 306&HC1 Professor Raissiguier

 

ANTHC 320.15

Blackness in Latin America and Caribbean

Mon Thurs 1:10-2:25pm C111HN combined with AFPRL 390.37 Professor Torres

 

ANTHC 320.28

Race, Gender, Colonialism and Climate Change

Tues Fri 11:10-12:25pm 505TH combined with AFPRL 390.37 Professor Bonilla

 

ANTHC 321.59
Human Rights of Indigenous People

Mon Thurs 4:10-5:25pm 705HN Quiroa-Crowell

 

 

ANTHC 325.51

Independent Research

TBA

 

 

ANTHC 400
Honors Project

TBA

 

ANTHC 401.61

Anthropology and Energy

Turn on a light bulb, swipe your metrocard, fill up at the gas pump: these daily activities make each of us part of a giant technological system for the production and distribution of energy. But what social and political forces led to the development of today’s integrated energy systems, and how do our energy-intensive lifestyles affect us, other people, and our shared environment? This course offers an in-depth survey of cultures of energy production and consumption in the contemporary world, and an opportunity to develop in formed answers to the important questions facing us as both city-dwellers and global citizens. How are diverse societies and cultures connected by the production and consumption of energy? How do current patterns of energy use

shape contemporary social life and our imagination of the future? Drawing on case-studies from the developed and the developing world, and examining sites of both the production and consumption of energy, this course offers an advanced introduction to the anthropology of science & technology and is an ideal elective for students interested in environmentalism, climate change, global power & politics, or technology & society.

 

Mon Thurs 11:10-12:25pm 705HN combined with ANTH 702.56 Professor Coleman

 

 

ANTHC 426.59

Archeology of North America

This course provides an overview of the prehistoric archaeology of the continental United States. We will study the lifeways of ancient Native Americans, from their first migration into the New World up until the time of European contact. Special emphasis will be placed on the native peoples of three specific regions: the Southwest, the Midwest, and New York, as case studies of adaptations to different environments. We will also examine several unresolved controversies surrounding the first entry of humans into the New World, the transition to agriculture, the development of complex forms of sociopolitical organization, and the impact of European colonization after 1492.

 

Tues 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTH 754 Professor Parry

 

ANTH 426.62
Gender in Archeology

Mon Thurs 1:10-2:25pm 705HN Professor Hicks

 

ANTHC 426.68
World of the Vikings

Between 700 and 1050 CE Scandinavian traders, settlers, pirates, and conquering armies left a permanent mark on the history, populations, and landscapes of Europe. Viking Age traders connected silver mines in Afghanistan with cattle markets in Ireland and fostered the creation of new trading towns from Novgorod to Dublin. They also sacked innumerable villages, towns, and cities and their sea-borne raids spread terror widely, leading to many hostile mentions in surviving documents.  Escalating warfare across the North Sea in the 10th and 11th centuries contributed to state formation on both sides, creating the later medieval kingdoms of England and Denmark. Viking age settlers also made more peaceful use of new seafaring technology and colonized the Atlantic islands from the Shetlands and Orkneys westwards to the Faroes, Iceland, Greenland, and (for a brief moment) to North America/Vinland.   In recent years archaeology has come to provide a rich record of the Viking Age and this course provides an overview of the new evidence for this critical period in world history, placing the Vikings in their wider social and environmental context.  The Vikings remain adventurous and bloodthirsty, but are now seen as engaged in complex long term human ecodynamics involving land, sea, climate, and human culture contact.

 

Fridays 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTH 751.67 Professor McGovern

 

ANTHC 498.01

Internship

TBA

 

Graduate

 

ANTH 702.56

Anthropology and Energy

Turn on a light bulb, swipe your metrocard, fill up at the gas pump: these daily activities make each of us part of a giant technological system for the production and distribution of energy. But what social and political forces led to the development of today’s integrated energy systems, and how do our energy-intensive lifestyles affect us, other people, and our shared environment? This course offers an in-depth survey of cultures of energy production and consumption in the contemporary world, and an opportunity to develop in formed answers to the important questions facing us as both city-dwellers and global citizens. How are diverse societies and cultures connected by the production and consumption of energy? How do current patterns of energy use

shape contemporary social life and our imagination of the future? Drawing on case-studies from the developed and the developing world, and examining sites of both the production and consumption of energy, this course offers an advanced introduction to the anthropology of science & technology and is an ideal elective for students interested in environmentalism, climate change, global power & politics, or technology & society.

 

Mon Thursday 11:10-12:25pm 705HN combined with ANTHC 401.61 Professor Coleman

 

ANTH 703

History of Anthropological Theory

This class is a selective, historical survey of anthropological theory. We will examine important theoretical accounts of human culture and society, covering works from the early twentieth century to the present, exploring how changing historical contexts, diverse fieldwork experiences, and philosophical trends have shaped the European and American development of sociocultural anthropology. This course particularly emphasizes the contributions of the anthropology of knowledge, political anthropology, and critiques of colonialism and of contemporary political economy. We will also seek to define the role that theories of culture, religion, power, gender, and history can and should play in a wider understanding of human beings as, at once, complexly social and complexly biological creatures. Ultimately we aim to gain a better understanding of how theories of the human, from universal "man" to "cultural diversity" to homo economicus, have shaped academic anthropology as well as their wider implications for contemporary life in society. This class meets once a week and will be conducted through seminar-style discussions; moreover, it is reading-and-writing-heavy. The reading load will average 100 pages a week (though readings each week will range in difficulty and length, from original theoretical analyses of particular ethnographic situations, to essays in intellectual history, to practitioner's reflections). There will be weekly reader-response papers, and the class will culminate in a final paper based on course reading.

 

Weds 5:30-7:20pm 717HN combined with ANTHC 318 Professor Fierman

 

ANTH706

Seminar Master’s Thesis

TBA

 

ANTH 718.50

Anthropology and Education

This course explores the relationship between anthropology and education. Anthropological perspectives on what is taught and learned, by whom, where, when and how. The course will review teaching and learning, from childhood through adulthood, in cross-cultural perspective, with an emphasis on what children [and adults] are taught, and how they learn. Current and classical research on the structure, function, and purpose of schooling and of non-formal education will be considered from the standpoint of the premises and values of contemporary American culture, viewed through the lens of anthropology.   

Weds 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTHC315.50 Professor Hodges

 

ANTH 751.67

World of Vikings

Between 700 and 1050 CE Scandinavian traders, settlers, pirates, and conquering armies left a permanent mark on the history, populations, and landscapes of Europe. Viking Age traders connected silver mines in Afghanistan with cattle markets in Ireland and fostered the creation of new trading towns from Novgorod to Dublin. They also sacked innumerable villages, towns, and cities and their sea-borne raids spread terror widely, leading to many hostile mentions in surviving documents.  Escalating warfare across the North Sea in the 10th and 11th centuries contributed to state formation on both sides, creating the later medieval kingdoms of England and Denmark. Viking age settlers also made more peaceful use of new seafaring technology and colonized the Atlantic islands from the Shetlands and Orkneys westwards to the Faroes, Iceland, Greenland, and (for a brief moment) to North America/Vinland.   In recent years archaeology has come to provide a rich record of the Viking Age and this course provides an overview of the new evidence for this critical period in world history, placing the Vikings in their wider social and environmental context.  The Vikings remain adventurous and bloodthirsty, but are now seen as engaged in complex long term human ecodynamics involving land, sea, climate, and human culture contact.

 

Fri 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTH 426.68 Professor McGovern

 

ANTH 754

Archeology of North America

This course provides an overview of the prehistoric archaeology of the continental United States. We will study the lifeways of ancient Native Americans, from their first migration into the New World up until the time of European contact. Special emphasis will be placed on the native peoples of three specific regions: the Southwest, the Midwest, and New York, as case studies of adaptations to different environments. We will also examine several unresolved controversies surrounding the first entry of humans into the New World, the transition to agriculture, the development of complex forms of sociopolitical organization, and the impact of European colonization after 1492.

 

Tues 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTHC 426.59 Professor Parry

 

ANTH 785

Independent Study or Research

TBA

 

ANTH 786

Independent Study or Research 2

TBA

 

ANTH 791.01

Human Osteology

Human Osteology provides a thorough introduction to the human skeleton.  The majority of the course will deal with skeletal anatomy, bone development, fragment identification, and tooth identification.  In addition, the knowledge gained about skeletal anatomy will be applied to the field of forensic anthropology.  Interpretation of skeletal features and landmarks will be used for assessing age, ancestry, sex, and stature.  The interpretation of skeletal trauma will also be discussed.

 

Tues 5:30-7:20pm 730HN combined with ANTHP 401.77 Professor Soler

 

ANTH 791.51

Seminar Primate Evolution

Weds 10:10-1:00pm 731B HN combined with ANTHP 311 Professor Gilbert

 

ANTH 791.53

Primate Conservation

This course will cover the science and ethical debates behind primate conservation. Humans are primates and, yet, our actions threaten the survival of many of our closest living relatives, nearly 50% of which are threatened with extinction. We will investigate the threats to wild primates and the strategies used to protect them. As other animal and plant species face similar threats, we will also rely on examples from beyond the primate world. *Note: This is a discussion-based course. It will be a mix of traditional lecture, class discussion, and guest lectures from experts in the field.

 

Mon 5:30-7:20pm 705HN combined with ANTHP 401.79 Professor Baden

 

 

 

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