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Spring 2020

Schedule

 

ANTHP 101

Human Evolution

Life and Physical Sciences (LPS) Scientific World (SW)

The study of human origins and adaptation, through an understanding of evolutionary mechanisms, genetics, comparative primate biology, the fossil record, and modern human variation.

 

ANTHP 105

The Human Species

Life and Physical Sciences (LPS)

In this course we examine human biology and behavior from an evolutionary perspective, comparing our anatomy, physiology, and behavior to those of living primates and other mammals. We will discuss the relative roles of genes (“nature”) and environment (“nurture”), the biological basis of behavior, local biological adaptations evident in modern human populations, growth and development, and diet and disease. Students will actively engage in the development of scientific hypotheses, data collection, and data synthesis analysis, as part of laboratory research experiences throughout the semester. Material covered will help prepare students to understand and evaluate recent advances in genetics, behavioral studies, medicine, and evolution.

T/F 9:10-10:00am 615HN plus lab section Levy

 

 ANTHP 302

Human Genetics

Analysis of distribution of contemporary human populations and microevolutionary processes that underlie human variability.

M/TH 9:45-11:00am 717HN Matthews

combined w/ Anth 793

 

 ANTHP 306

Human Anatomy

The goal of this course is to understand basic human anatomy: know all of the bones, muscles, major nerves and vessels in the human body, how they are organized, and how they function. Typically, there will be two class periods spent on a given topic: the first class meeting will be a lecture and the second class meeting on a given topic will provide a laboratory setting where students can handle and work with real osteological specimens and/or anatomical models. A given lecture will provide a synthesis of a particular anatomical region and the hands-on details of regional anatomy will then be learned in the associated laboratory session. To gain the most from each lecture and laboratory session, you must do the assigned readings and relevant exercises in the lab workbook beforehand. The laboratory workbook is a required acquisition. Any anatomy textbook will provide you with the necessary reading for lectures, and the purchase of an anatomy atlas is highly recommended as well. In order to do well in the course, additional study time with the anatomical models may be necessary. We will set up a system to encourage and facilitate study time outside of class.

W/F 3:10-4:25pm 730HN Parks

 

ANTHP 316

Human Evolutionary Adaptations

How does the human body work, and how did it get that way? This course investigates the workings and evolution of all aspects of human biology. Human physiology is considered in an evolutionary framework.

M/W 2:45-4:00pm 705HN Matthews

combined w/ Anth 791.65

 

ANTHC 100

Cultural Diversity in the United States

Writing intensive, CORE: US Experience in its Diversity

Introduction to the critical and comparative study of cultural diversity in the United States.

T/F 1:10-2:00pm Section 1 415HW plus discussion section Jopling

            combined w/ X2-1 Lec class # 46757

T/F 10:10-11:00am Section 2 C002HN plus discussion section Gerdes

            combined w/ X2-2 Lec class # 46769

M/TH 4:10-5:25pm Section 3 705HN plus discussion section Mendelsohn

 

 ANTHC 101

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Individual and Society (Social Sciences) -I&S SS

Comparative and historical examination of the human condition through a focus on diverse responses to universal problems, such as making a living, resolving conflict, organizing family/kin relations and finding meaning in the world.

M/TH 3:10-4:00pm Section 2 615HW plus discussion section Koga

T/TH 4:10-5:25pm Section 3 415HW plus discussion section Creed

S 11:10-2:00pm Section 4 510HN plus discussion section Hodges

 

ANTHC 126

Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology

World Culture and Global Issues (WCGI)

Human social and cultural evolution from the earliest humans to the rise of the first civilizations.

M/TH 11:10-12:25pm 511HW Parry

 

 ANTHC 127

Methods in Archaeological Science

SW

Introduction to theory and method of scientific research in archaeology.

W 10:30-1:00pm Section 1 717HN Mann

F 2:10-5:00pm Section 2 717HN Hicks

 

ANTHC 151

Introduction to Linguistics

World Cultures and Global Issues (WCGI)

Structure and analysis of human languages; language history; language in society, culture and mind; language universals.

T/F 2:10-3:25pm C002HN Clemente Pesudo

 

ANTHC 218

The Anthropology of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S

Pluralism and Diversity

This course examines the grassroots struggle to gain equality and justice in the United States, viewed as a social protest movement, from the perspective of cultural anthropology. The course will focus on the major events, themes and issues of the Civil Rights Movement and examine their effect in challenging the American concept of democracy; in changing those who participated in it; and in spawning other social movements that transformed American society and culture.

T 2:10-5:00pm 717HN Hodges

 

ANTHC 303.50

Community Organization and Action

F 11:10-2:00pm C114HN Hammami

combined w/ Soc 235, SoSci 397, Urbs40395, Comhe 40050, and SW 360

 

ANTHC 305

Psychological Anthropology

M/TH 2:45-4:00pm 717HN Fierman

combined w/ Anth 710

 

 ANTHC 308

Human Ecology

Relationship between human populations and environment; ecosystems, population interactions, resource management and environmental movements.

T 5:30-7:20pm 717HN McGovern

combined w/ Anth 715

 

ANTHC 314

Research Design in Anthropology

Introduction to basic principles of research design employed in anthropology.

T/F 11:10-12:25pm 717HN McGovern

combined w/ Anth 702.68

 

ANTHC 320.02

Language and Body

The human body –and more general, the materiality of bodies and objects– is at the center of much contemporary research. After a period during which the body was peripheral, implicit, or analytically invisible in discourse-focused social sciences, we now encounter terms such as multimodality, multisemiosis, corporeality, intersubjectivity, bodily inscription, and lived worlds and embodied experiences. In social studies of language, linguistic communication becomes one among multiple resources for meaning making, and is analyzed in coordination with eye

gaze, gesture, prosody, object manipulation, and body orientation, posture, and movement. Even the senses, such as tactility, are beginning to make their way into studies of communication. Exploring this exciting new frontier, students in this class will be introduced to corporeal “turn” in the social sciences as well as learn how to analyze the different communicative modalities found in human interaction.

T 5:30-7:20pm 705HN Clemente Pesudo

combined w/ Anth 771.61

 

ANTHC 320.27

Folklore in Translation: A Comparative Study

World Culture and Global Issues (WCGI), Pluralism and Diversity

Folklore of Australia, Oceania, Europe, Africa, North and South America and the Near East will be read in juxtaposition to Russian folklore.

T/F 3:45-5:00pm 411 HW Alexander

crosslisted w/ Russ 293, and Compl 37057

 

ANTHC 320.89

Archeology of Mesoamerica

Sociocultural development from early hunter-gatherers to first pre-Hispanic states and empires.

TH 5:30-7:20pm 705HN Parry

combined w/ Anth 751.61

 

ANTHC 32152

Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

Religion and magic have been part of our efforts to make sense of the world and evoked a great sense of curiosity among social scientists. With the secular turn after the Enlightenment era; religion, magic and witchcraft have been associated with what is imagined as tradition and the “enchanted” past while reason and science are considered to be representing the secular, “disenchanted” era.

In this group seminar, we will study different theories of magic, witchcraft, and religion.

M/TH 4:10-5:25pm 717HN Ozbarlas

 

ANTHC 325.67

Sociolinguistics

This course introduces the study of language use in society in relation to class, gender, ethnicity, race, and age. The nature of language and language rights including pidgins, creoles, and dialects are examined. Critical discourse theory is introduced as part of the analysis of the relationship of language and education, social mobility and power.

M/TH 1:10-2:25pm 408HW Swift

combined w/ Engl 330

 

ANTHC 330

Food and Culture

Food and culture are examined in all their relations, from production to consumption, including how societies vary in their tastes and practices of distinction, how food is used to convey symbolic meanings and display power, and how global societies can meet challenges of scarcity, sustainability, and ethical management across the food system.

T/F 9:45-11:00am 717HN Edelman

combined w/ Anth 702.62

 

ANTHC 332

Medical Anthropology

This course provides an advanced introduction to Medical Anthropology, a vast subfield of Anthropology with many applications in the health sciences and industries. The focus is on how social groups variously experience, act upon and make meaning of health, wellbeing, illness, disease, and healing. The course emphasizes the complexities of health and illness in the context of cultural beliefs and practices, as well as in relation to broader, macro-level processes on both local and global scales.

T/F 12:45-2:00pm 717HN Gensler

 

ANTHC 345

Anthropology of Science

This course examines how scientific knowledge is made in laboratories and other venues of scientific practice, while helping students develop critical evaluations of the power and authority of science and understand its role in current social problems. Students will examine scientific practices and notions of objectivity; make comparisons with indigenous, non-Western, and lay knowledge systems; and explore ethical and legal aspects of scientific innovation.

M/TH 11;10-12:25pm 717HN Coleman

combined w/ Anth 771.62

 

ANTHC 426.60

Archaeology of Colonialism

T/F 9:45-11:00am 705HN Hicks

 

Graduate courses

 

ANTH 702.62

Anthropology of Food

Food and culture are examined in all their relations, from production to consumption, including how societies vary in their tastes and practices of distinction, how food is used to convey symbolic meanings and display power, and how global societies can meet challenges of scarcity, sustainability, and ethical management across the food system.

T/F 9:45-11:00am 717HN Edelman

combined w/ Anthc 330

 

ANTH 702.68

Research Design in Anthropology

Introduction to basic principles of research design employed in anthropology.

T/F 11:10-12:25pm 717HN McGovern

combined w/ Anthc 314

 

ANTH  710

Psychological Anthropology

M/TH 4:10-5:25pm 717HN Fierman

combined w/ Anthc 305

 

ANTH 715

Prehistoric Human Ecology

Problems in analysis of interaction of human economies and changing natural environments. Archaeological view of human role in various ancient ecosystems.

T 5:30-7:20pm 717HN McGovern

combined w/ Anthc 308

 

ANTH 751.61

Archaeology of Mesoamerica

The following course presents a survey of the archaeology of a particular world region and treats some major questions which arise in that context

TH 5:30-7:20pm 705HN Parry

combined w/ Anthc 320.89

 

ANTH 771.61

Language and Body

T 5:30-7:20pm 705HN Clemente Pesudo

combined w/ Anthc 320.02

 

ANTH 771.62

Anthropology of Science

This course examines how scientific knowledge is made in laboratories and other venues of scientific practice, while helping students develop critical evaluations of the power and authority of science and understand its role in current social problems. Students will examine scientific practices and notions of objectivity; make comparisons with indigenous, non-Western, and lay knowledge systems; and explore ethical and legal aspects of scientific innovation.

M/TH 11:10-12:25pm 717HN Coleman

combined w/ Anthc 345

 

ANTH 791.65

Human Evolutionary Adaptations

How does the human body work, and how did it get that way? This course investigates the workings and evolution of all aspects of human biology. Human physiology is considered in an evolutionary framework.

M/W 2:45-4:00pm 705HN Matthews

combined w/ Anthp 316

 

ANTH 793

Human Evolutionary Genetics

Analysis of distribution of contemporary human populations and microevolutionary processes that underlie human variability.

M/TH 9:45-11:00am 717HN Matthews

combined w/ Anthp 302

 

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