Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Masterlinks
You are here: Home Anthropology COURSES Summer 2020

Summer 2020

schedule

 

Six Weeks I

May 26, 2020 – July 6, 2020

 ANTHC 325.67

Sociolinguistics

This course introduces the study of language use in society in relation to class, gender, ethnicity, race, and age. The nature of language and language rights including pidgins, creoles, and dialects are examined. Critical discourse theory is introduced as part of the analysis of the relationship of language and education, social mobility, and power.

M/T/W/TH 1:30-3:04pm 707C HW crosslisted w/ Engl 330 Kenigsberg

 

Second Session (Six Weeks)

July 6, 2020 – August 8, 2020

 ANTHP 105

The Human Species

In this course we examine human biology and behavior from an evolutionary perspective, comparing our anatomy, physiology, and behavior to those of living primates and other mammals. We will discuss the relative roles of genes (“nature”) and environment (“nurture”), the biological basis of behavior, local biological adaptations evident in modern human populations, growth and development, and diet and disease. Students will actively engage in the development of scientific hypotheses, data collection, and data synthesis analysis, as part of laboratory research experiences throughout the semester. Material covered will help prepare students to understand and evaluate recent advances in genetics, behavioral studies, medicine, and evolution.

Yao

 

ANTHP 305

Evolution of the Human Skeleton

The goal of this course is to understand the biology of the human skeleton: know all of the bones of the human body, how they work, and how they evolved This course will cover basic bone and muscle biology, bone and bone landmark identification, basic dental anatomy, basic functional interpretation, and discuss the evolution of the human skeleton with comparisons to great ape and fossil material. Typically, there will be two class periods spent on a given topic: the first class meeting will be a lecture and the second class meeting on a given topic will provide a laboratory-type setting where students can handle and work with real osteological specimens and/or fossil casts. Occasionally, the first half of a class period will be a lecture, and the second half will be a lab. Worksheets/Study Guides will be provided and are expected to be completed by the end of the lab. In order to become skilled in bone identification and do well in the course, additional study time with the bones will most likely be necessary. We will set up a system to encourage and facilitate study time outside of class.

M/W 11:40-2:48pm Online Venner

 

Eight Weeks I

May 26, 2020-July 20,2020

ANTHC 10000  

Cultural Diversity in the United States: Historical and Ethnographic Perspectives

Writing intensive, CORE: US Experience in its Diversity

Introduction to the critical and comparative study of cultural diversity in the United States.

M/W 11:40-2:00pm Section 1 705HN Munia

T/TH 11:40-2:00pm Section 2 705HN Gerdes

 

ANTHC 10100

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Individual and Society (Social Sciences) -I&S SS

Comparative and historical examination of the human condition through a focus on diverse responses to universal problems, such as making a living, resolving conflict, organizing family/kin relations, and finding meaning in the world.

Asynchronous course Lozny

 

ANTHP 105

The Human Species (Lab)

Life and Physical Sciences (LPS)

In this course we examine human biology and behavior from an evolutionary perspective, comparing our anatomy, physiology, and behavior to those of living primates and other mammals. We will discuss the relative roles of genes (“nature”) and environment (“nurture”), the biological basis of behavior, local biological adaptations evident in modern human populations, growth and development, and diet and disease. Students will actively engage in the development of scientific hypotheses, data collection, and data synthesis analysis, as part of laboratory research experiences throughout the semester. Material covered will help prepare students to understand and evaluate recent advances in genetics, behavioral studies, medicine, and evolution.

T/TH 3:20-5:40pm Section 1 Online Prang

T/TH 12:30-2:50pm Section 2 Online Prang

M/W 1:30-3:50pm Section 3 Online Evans

M/W 11:00-1:20pm Section 4 Online Evans

T/TH 9:50-12:10pm Section 5 Online Kozma

 

ANTHP 305

Evolution of the Human Skeleton

The goal of this course is to understand the biology of the human skeleton: know all of the bones of the human body, how they work, and how they evolved This course will cover basic bone and muscle biology, bone and bone landmark identification, basic dental anatomy, basic functional interpretation, and discuss the evolution of the human skeleton with comparisons to great ape and fossil material. Typically, there will be two class periods spent on a given topic: the first class meeting will be a lecture and the second class meeting on a given topic will provide a laboratory-type setting where students can handle and work with real osteological specimens and/or fossil casts. Occasionally, the first half of a class period will be a lecture, and the second half will be a lab. Worksheets/Study Guides will be provided and are expected to be completed by the end of the lab. In order to become skilled in bone identification and do well in the course, additional study time with the bones will most likely be necessary. We will set up a system to encourage and facilitate study time outside of class.

M/W 4:00-6:20pm Online Getahun

 

ANTHC 32018

Language, Health & Medicine

This course combines health communication, anthropology (particularly medical and psychological anthropology), social interactional approaches to health communication (particularly conversation analytic approaches to institutional talk), and research at the intersection of linguistic and medical anthropology. Special topics to be covered include critical approaches to health communication, power, and, inequality; risk communication and health disparities; narrative medicine; biocommunicability and biopolitics of pandemics; human development across the lifespan; performativity, embodiment, corporeality, intersubjectivity, and multimodal interaction; pain and suffering; death and dying; and disability. 

 

Asynchronous course Clemente Pesudo

 

Document Actions
Anthropology website feedback:
North Building Room 722
(212) 772-5410 | email us
HUNTER COLLEGE
695 Park Ave
NY, NY 10065
212.772.4000