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Sculpture

The sculpture department offers students the opportunity to thoroughly understand the theoretical concerns of contemporary sculpture and develop the basic skills needed to bring this knowledge to an active art practice.  Our goal is to approach the diverse means of producing all work that relates to the concepts of materiality and space, including installation art, environmental projects, and the production of objects and materials to be exhibited or distributed in non-traditional ways and spaces.  Faculty members, all exhibiting professional artists, propose concept oriented projects and work individually with students to assess the best means possible to execute their plans.  Emphasis is placed upon the formal critique of completed projects as a means to give students a greater understanding of concepts of sculpture and the opportunity to verbally articulate their own knowledge of art. 

The sculpture area facilities are located in the east wing of the 11thFloor of the North Building, where there is a total of 4735 square feet of space, consisting of an open critique room, wood shop, metal shop, plaster room and spray booth.

Each semester, three sections of beginning & advanced sculpture are offered, in addition to a special topic class.

SPRING 2015 COURSES

 

ArtCR 251/352 BEGINNING & ADVANCED SCULPTURE Section 001
Tuesday 1:10 – 4:50
Prof. Nari Ward
Students are presented with open problems (assignments in which to inspire and challenge).  Issues of object - making such as materials, context, form and economics are examined.  Students are required to view assigned exhibitions and keep a sketch journal.  Instructor works with each student to discuss ideas.  Experimenting is encouraged.  Group critiques are an important area of class participation.

ArtCR 251/352 BEGINNING & ADVANCED SCULPTURE Section 002
Thursday 1:10 – 4:50
Prof. Lynn Sullivan
With four projects that approach key elements of sculpture, students are asked to consider material transformation and space through the framework of narrative, philosophy and culture.  Past assignments have included Myth & MatterImmateriality and Metaphor in Structure.  Students will be expected to independently plan their projects. Brainstorming, making detailed proposals, independently researching unique materials, and extensive participation in group discussions are important components to the class.

ArtCR 251/352 BEGINNING & ADVANCED SCULPTURE Section 003
Monday 5:35pm – 9:15pm

ArtCR 360.44 THE LANGUAGE OF MULTIMEDIA ART
Wednesday 5:35 – 8:15pm
Prof. Hugh Walton 

The course will explore the relationship between text/language and art through a series of three (3) assignments. The assignments will include two-dimensional (collage), three-dimensional (sculpture) and four-dimensional (animation) projects. The multidisciplinary nature of the projects will help demonstrate how text/language has been integrated into all forms of contemporary art practice. Technical instruction will be provided through a series of project specific demonstrations. The techniques covered will include collage, found object assembly, and stop-motion animation. 

The three projects will be accompanied by a series of lectures. They will examine the roots of the appropriation of text/language into art, focusing specifically on the artists and ideologies of the Conceptual Art Movement. The lectures will also focus on various theories exposing the contradictions and paradoxes of linear thought and linguistic order, exemplified by theorist such as Ferdinand de Saussure ("Course in General Linguistics"). Additionally, the lectures will link various technological developments throughout the last two centuries (i.e. mechanical printing and advertising, the Internet, etc.) to artistic innovation.