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Courses Fall 2012



Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses

 

GERMN 101: Elementary German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45am - 11:00am
1492
Merolle 509B West
02 Cancelled
Tues & Fri 9:45am - 11:00am
4608 Dunningan 611 West
03
Tues & Fri
11:10am - 12:25pm
1493 Kasprzyk 611 West
04 Mon & Thurs 4:10pm - 5:25pm 1494 Wicker 509B West
51 Tues & Thurs 5:35pm-6:50pm 1495 Strohmeier 611 West
181 Mon & Thurs 2:45pm - 4:00pm 1496 Anderson 509B West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 102: Elementary German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Tues & Fri
9:45am - 11:00am
1497 Kasprzyk 509B West
02
Mon & Thurs 1:10pm - 2:25pm
1498 Beckett 509B West
51 Mon & Wed 5:35pm- 6:50pm 4610 You 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German I & II (6 hours, 6 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon, W, Th 11:10am- 1:00pm 1499 Zimmerman 509B West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 201: Intermediate German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45am- 11:00am
1500 Anderson 611 West
02 Mon & Thurs 4:10pm - 5:25pm 1501 Beckett 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 202: Intermediate German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
1:10pm- 2:25pm
1502 Kuhn-Osius 611 West
Click here for course description.

 


Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level I

(What is the difference between Level I and Level II courses?)

GERMN 301: Advanced Germa Comprehension & Conversation (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirement GER 3/A.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
51 Mon & Wed 5:35pm- 6:50pm 1506 Zimmerman 509B West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 320.58: German Comics & Graphic Literature (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 2:45pm - 4:00pm 4717 Kuhn-Osius 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 323: Women in German Literature (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
51 Mon & Wed 7:00pm- 8:15pm
4612 Nicolai 509B West
Click here for course description.

 

Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level II

GERMN 342: The German Novel (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: One Course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A  and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 4:10pm- 5:25pm
4614 Anderson 1441 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 385.01 The German Press: Reading & Understanding Newspapers & Magazines (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: Two Courses above GERMN 300 or equivalent (excluding courses in English translation). Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Cancelled
Mon & Thurs 11:10am- 12:25pm
4902 Kuhn-Osius 413 West
Click here for course description.

 


Course in German Literature & Civilization (Conducted in English)

 

GERMN 240: German Thought & Culture (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: or Coreq: ENGL 120. Fulfills requirements GER 2/C and PD/D and Writing ("W").
Section
Day Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Wed 4:10pm - 5:25pm
1503 Zimmerman 413 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 241: German Fairy Tales (3 hours, 3 credits)
Pre: or Coreq: ENGL 120. Fulfills requirements GER 2/C and PD/D and Writing ("W").
Section
Day Time Code Instructor Room
01 Saturday 8:10am - 11:00am
1505 Titze 611 West
02 Tues & Thurs 4:10pm-5:25pm 4611 Titze 413 West
Click here for course description.

 


 

 

Course Descriptions


Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses


GERMN 101: Elementary German I

This course is for students without prior knowledge of German. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch I, ISBN 0-07-285376-x

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 102: Elementary German II

This course continues the work of GERMN 101. It broadens linguistic and cultural abilities for basic communication in a German-speaking environment. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch II, ISBN 0-07-3019364

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German I & II

This course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of German.  It covers in ONE semester the material normally covered in two semesters, in GERMN 101-102.  It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch I and II, ISBN 0-07-285376-x; ISBN 0-07-3019364

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 201: Intermediate German I

This course is the third in a four-semester sequence and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction to German. Review and practice of elementary grammar; introduction of advanced forms. Reading and discussion of selected texts. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 202: Intermediate German II

Continued broadening of abilities in speaking, listening, reading, writing. Reading and discussion of selected literary texts. Strong emphasis on active student participation. Regular attendance and daily homework are important elements in this course. Completion of this course fulfills the Hunter College foreign language requirement. Students at this level will normally be tested by both written and oral examination.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8; additional handouts

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

Advanced German Language, Literature & Culture Courses

 

What is the difference between Level I and Level II advanced courses?

The advanced German courses are divided into two levels.  We expect students to take at least two literature courses at Level I before proceeding to Level II.  If you are in any doubt as to which course you should take, or if you have previous knowledge of German, please consult the chair of the department. All of these courses are conducted in German. All 300-level courses in German plus 444 count as Focused Exposure Stage 3, Group A.

Level I courses are intended for students who have recently completed GERMN 202 or 203 and who have only limited experience discussing German literature in German, orally and in writing. They are not intended for native speakers.

Level II courses are intended for advanced students who have taken a number of 300-level German language and literature courses and who may be interested in going on to use the German language professionally. They are thus meant to help students move to the highest levels of the undergraduate program and beyond. Students enrolled in Level II courses have the opportunity to take the B2 and C1 exams, the professional certificates of advanced language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. The exams are given each spring. Fees charged by the Goethe Institute will be announced in advance.

 

GERMN 301: Advanced German Comprehension & Conversation

The course is designed to develop the conversational and compositional skills. There will be intensive practice of contemporary spoken and written German with emphasis on vocabulary and idiom, and on active mastery of grammatical forms. Audio material will be used to strengthen comprehension skills. Regular preparation in writing is required for group work and class dialogues. The course prepares students to take the examination for the Zertifikat Deutsch, the professional certificate of basic language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. Fees charged by the Goethe Institute will be announced in advance.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: To be announced

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 320.58: German Comics & Graphic Literature

In the course of the 20th century pictorial presentations of stories, which seemed banished to irrelevance in the course of the 19th century, have become quite important. With the gradual blurring of the demarcation lines between high culture and pop culture, they have gained considerable respectability, and many of these stories are firmly embedded in the cultural memory of German-speaking culture. The class will focus on graphic literature from Germany (German-speaking countries) and in Germany. We will start with some history of comic-strip-like writing and then focus on a number of works, chiefly by Wilhelm Busch and Seyfried. We shall also look at works by Franziska Becker, Chlodwig Poth, Walter Moers, and others, trying to get a handle on the extensive field of German humor (which, in contrast to stereotypes about Germans, has a long and distinguished tradition).  In addition to studying indigenous German comics, we will look at some famous translations of international comics and some attempts to create a more serious German graphic literature in recent years, in addition to the wave of German mangas.
Students will have to attend class regularly and are expected to contribute to class discussion in German. Each student will also deliver a German in-class presentation about a comic of his/her choosing (with the help of the instructor). Each student is expected to produce at least 12 pages of expository writing in German, which will be divided into several small assignments, depending on each student’s proficiency. The reading load will not be excessive, but reading needs to be detailed and you should learn to verbalize what the stories are about. Some research may be needed to identify images and allusions in the pictures.
The materials will be handouts and online. There may be one book ordered from Germany, but the total price is not expected to be more than about $40.  A decision on the title of such a book, if it is to be bought, has not yet been made.

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 323 Women in German Literature

In this course, we shall read and discuss different genres of literature written by women of the 19th and 20th centuries. We shall examine the cultural and social role of women and what kind of literary channels were open to them at different times. Authors such as Bettina von Arnim, Fanny Lewald, Amelie Godin, Annette von Droste-Hülshoff, Anna Seghers, Gabriele Wohmann and others will be discussed. There will be regular writing assignments in German as well as written exams. All reading and discussion will be in German.
Exam format: written midterm and final exams
The course pack will be available from the library’s e-reserve system.

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 342 The German Novel

Students in this course will experience some of the most celebrated novels ever written in German. We will begin with JW von Goethe’s Die Leiden des jungen Werthers (1774), the epistolary novel that unleashed a storm of controversy and first established Goethe’s fame throughout Europe. We will then turn to Theodor Storm’s adultery novel Effi Briest (1896), which Thomas Mann famously said would have to be included on even the most selective lists of great novels. Next we will consider one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century literature, Franz Kafka’s Der Prozeß (1925), which includes the famous parable “Vor dem Gesetz.” A fourth novel may be announced once the semester begins.
We will examine the historical and cultural background of each novel as well as the careers of the authors. And we will study the form and history of the novel as a literary genre, especially in Germany.
This course is conducted entirely in German. Course requirements include: attendance and participation; regular homework and class preparation; significant paper writing; and an e-Portfolio.
Books will be ordered by the instructor directly, not through a bookstore. It is important that all students have the proper editions, in order to facilitate class discussion.
Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Die Leiden des jungen Werthers. ISBN: 978-3-15-018632-9
Theodor Fontane, Effi Briest. ISBN: 978-3-15-006961-5
Franz Kafka, Der Prozeß. ISBN: 3-596-12443-3
A fourth novel may be announced once the semester begins.

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 385.01 The German Press: Reading & Understanding Newspapers & Magazines

The aim of the course is twofold: to give an introduction to the main types of printed news sources available in German today (newspapers, magazines, weeklies), and to provide experience in reading them. Conducted in German, with discussions and writing exercises in German, texts read in German, occasional translation into English. The course is not intended for, or open to, native speakers of German.
We will discuss newspaper articles on politics, culture, education, etc. by paying particular attention to content, style and readership.
Exam format: midterm and final exams, as well as three papers (approx. four pages each).
Students will be given handouts of current articles from German newspapers and magazines.

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

Courses Conducted in English

 

GERMN 240 German Thought and Culture

This course is an introduction to patterns of thought and culture which have developed in the German-speaking countries from the eighteenth to the late twentieth century. We shall read (in English translation) representative writings by major authors in literary, philosophical, political and other fields. These texts will be discussed in their historical context and in the context of developments in the fine arts. Regular writing assignments will be required.
Exam format: written midterm project and final cultural project.
Required textbook: Hagen Schulze, Germany: A New History (Harvard, 1998). ISBN  0-67400545-7.  
Excerpts from the following texts, which are in the public domain and can be accessed free of charge from the Internet:
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von. Faust. Trans. W. Kaufman (Anchor Books, 1961). ISBN 0-385-03114-9.
Marx, Karl, and Friedrich Engels. The Communist Manifesto (Penguin Books, 2002).  ISBN 0-14-044757-1.
Kafka, Franz. The Basic Kafka (Pocket Books, 1979). ISBN 0-671-53145-X.

 

GERMN 241 German Fairy Tales

Fairy tales are known all over the world.  The most famous European book of fairy tales is the one collected by the Brothers Grimm.  These stories have entered our collective unconscious but are not easily explained.  We shall look at various attempts to explain what fairy tales are all about, look at older stories that served as models for the Brothers Grimm, and study modern versions of the tales, including a Walt Disney movie and “politically correct fairy tales.”  Students will read fairy tales, tell one that they know, and write three short papers, a midterm and final examination.  All readings, discussions and written work will be in English.  This course has a “W” designation.
Exam format: written midterm and final exams
Textbooks: Jack Zipes, The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 978-0553382167
                   Joanna Cole, The Best-Loved Fairy Tales of the World, ISBN 978-0318796482

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