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Courses Fall 2019

 

Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses


GERMN 101: Elementary German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
8:10am-9:25am
5410 Nicolai 509B West
02
Tues & Fri 11:10am-12:25pm
5412 Wicker  611 West
03
Tues & Fri
2:10pm-3:25pm
5411 Koch
509B West
04 Mon & Weds 4:10pm-5:25pm 5413 Staff TBA
05 Tues & Thurs
5:35pm-6:50pm 5542 Staff 611 West
06
Tues & Thurs 4:10pm-5:25pm
6292 Staff 611 West

Course description below.

 

GERMN 102: Elementary German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45am-11:00am
5414 Strohmeier
509B West
02
Tues & Fri 11:10am-12:25pm
5415 Koch 509B West
03 Mon & Wed 5:35pm-6:50pm 5543 Staff  509B West

Course description below.

 

GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German I & II (6 hours, 6 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
M, W, Th 11:10am-1:00pm 6647 Merolle
509B West

Course description below.

 

GERMN 201: Intermediate German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Tues & Fri
9:45am-11:00am
5544 Wicker 611 West
02 Mon & Thurs 2:45pm-4:00pm 5416 Strohmeier
611 West
03
Tues & Thurs 5:35pm-6:50pm 5417 Koch 509B West

Course description below.

 

GERMN 202: Intermediate German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45am-11:00am
5418 Kuhn-Osius TBA
02 Tues & Fri
12:45pm-2:00pm 5545 Wicker 509B West

Course description below.

 


Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level I

(What is the difference between Level I and Level II courses?)

GERMN 301: Advanced German Comprehension & Conversation (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 1:10pm-2:25pm 5421 Zimmerman
509B West

Course description below.

GERMN 324: Post-Feminist German Literature & Film (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. 
Section Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 4:10pm-5:25pm 27497 Nicolai 509B West

Course description below.

GERMN 334: German Short Story & Novella (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. 
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs
2:45pm-4:00pm
27495 Zimmerman 509B West

Course description below.

Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level II

GERMN 353: Goethe's Faust (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: One Course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or equivalent.

Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 11:10am-12:25pm
27498 Kuhn-Osius 611 West

Course description below.

GERMN 38504: Advanced German Through Translation (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: Two courses above GERMN 300 or equivalent.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 1:10pm-2:25pm
27499 Anderson 611 West
Course description below.

Courses in German Literature & Civilization (Conducted in English) 

GERMN 241: German Fairy Tales (3 hours, 3 credits)
Pre- or Coreq: ENGL 120.
Section
Day Time Code Instructor Room
01 Saturday
8:10am-11:00am
5419 Titze 509B West
02 Mon & Thurs 8:10am-9:25am 5420 Titze 611 West
03 Mon & Thurs 11:10am-12:25pm 4545 Strohmeier TBA
04 Tues & Fri 8:10am-9:25am 7005 Titze 611 West
(HC1) Mon & Thurs 9:45am-11:00am 5923 Zimmerman 611 West

241 Fulfills the "Creative Expression" category of the Hunter core.

Course description below.

 

Course Descriptions


Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses

GERMN 101:  Elementary German I  3hrs, 3crs.

No pre-req 

This course is for students without prior knowledge of German. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 1. ISBN 9781524996246

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 102:  Elementary German II  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent.

This course continues the work of GERMN 101. It broadens linguistic and cultural abilities for basic communication in a German-speaking environment. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 2. ISBN 9781524996253

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 103:  Intensive Elementary German I & II  3hrs, 3crs.

No pre-req 

This course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of German.  It covers in ONE semester the material normally covered in two semesters, in GERMN 101-102.  It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbooks: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 1. ISBN 9781524996246 AND Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 2. ISBN 9781524996253

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 201:  Intermediate German I  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent.

This course is the third in a four-semester sequence and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction to German. Review and practice of elementary grammar; introduction of advanced forms. Reading and discussion of selected texts. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Jägerbuch Band 3 Coursepack (2019), ISBN 9660201814229

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 202:  Intermediate German II  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent.

Continued broadening of abilities in speaking, listening, reading, writing. Reading and discussion of selected literary texts. Strong emphasis on active student participation. Regular attendance and daily homework are important elements in this course. Completion of this course fulfills the Hunter College foreign language requirement. Students at this level will normally be tested by both written and oral examination.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Jägerbuch Band 3 Coursepack (2019), ISBN 9660201814229

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

Advanced German Language, Literature & Culture Courses

 

What is the difference between Level I and Level II advanced courses?

The advanced German courses are divided into two levels.  We expect students to take at least two literature courses at Level I before proceeding to Level II.  If you are in any doubt as to which course you should take, or if you have previous knowledge of German, please consult the chair of the department. 

Level I courses are intended for students who have recently completed GERMN 202 or 203 and who have only limited experience discussing German literature in German, orally and in writing. They are not intended for native speakers.

Level II courses are intended for advanced students who have taken a number of 300-level German language and literature courses and who may be interested in going on to use the German language professionally. They are thus meant to help students move to the highest levels of the undergraduate program and beyond. Students enrolled in Level II courses have the opportunity to take the B2 and C1 exams, the professional certificates of advanced language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. The exams are given each spring. Fees charged by the Goethe Institute will be announced in advance.

 

GERMN 301:  Advanced German Comprehension & Conversation  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. 

This course is designed to develop conversational and compositional skills.  There will be intensive practice in contemporary spoken and written German with emphasis on vocabulary and idiom, and on active mastery of grammatical forms.  Audio-visual material will be used to strengthen comprehension skills.  Regular preparation in writing is required for group work and class dialogues. The course prepares students to take the (optional) B1 examination, the professional certificate of basic language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. The exam is given each spring. Fees charged by the Goethe Institute will be announced in advance. 

Course requirements: Active preparation and participation, written homework, oral presentations and written essays, group projects

Exam format: group project

Textbooks:This is a ZERO cost course. The e-textbook, authored by Dr. Zimmerman, is provided free of cost. iPads will be on loan to the students for use during the semester to access the e-book.

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 324:  Post-feminist German Literature and Film  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent.

In this course we will primarily take a look at women's writings at the end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. We will read women's literature that was published since the mid-eighties after the heyday of feminism in Germany. We will examine to what extent the female aesthetic has changed since its beginnings in the early seventies. We will also look at some literary film adaptations of women's novels.

In the seventies, in the aftermath of the student revolution, feminist discourse was established when women realized that the discussion of their roles in society had been excluded from the liberating process that encompassed almost all other areas in social life. Looking for a redefinition of gender roles, they discussed questions of sexual orientation. In their desire for visibility in all aspects of public life, they explored and established venues for political expression. Their literature bore witness to their struggles and desires. Today, more than thirty years later, when women seem to have achieved their goals of the feminist movement, women's literature has changed. We will look at the topics and narrative style of German female writers who write bestseller literature today. Today's women's literature has lost much of its radical feminist vigor by setting a new humorous and ironic tone. We will also read some poetry.

This course is entirely taught in German; the focus will be on close reading of the texts. We shall try to build up the vocabulary and modes of expression needed for this kind of discourse. There will be three longer writing assignments or a series of shorter ones depending on the proficiency level of the individual student, a midterm, and a final exam.

Textbooks: Claudia Schreiber (2003): Emmas Glück ISBN   978-3-442-45867-7 Charlotte Roche (2009): Feuchtgebiete ISBN 978-3-548-28040-0

We will also watch the films based on these novels.

Additional texts will be distributed digitally or as photocopies. We will start with excerpts from Häutungen, published 1975 by Verena Stefan. We will also read some excerpts from the novel by Giulia Becker, Das Leben ist eins der Härtesten, published 2019.


 

GERMN 334:  Short Story and Novelle  3hrs, 3crs. 

Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent.

In this course we will read and discuss some of the best short prose German literature has to offer: 2-3 novellas and 3-4 short stories from the late eighteenth century to the present. Authors may include, but are not limited to: Goethe, Kafka, Tieck, Storm, Borchert and von Droste-Hülshoff. We will also read a piece of contemporary short prose and discuss it with the author in person.The exact amount of reading will be determined after students' reading and writing proficiency have been assessed.  

The primary goal of this course is to improve reading comprehension, oral proficiency and writing proficiency in German. The course is also designed to increase students' familiarity with literary form, literary history, and German culture. This course is conducted in German, and there will be written assignments and exams in German.

Course requirements: Active preparation and participation, written homework, three papers

Exam format: midterm and final exams

Textsbooks: Many texts will be provided via photocopy. Books will be ordered by the instructor directly, not through the bookstore.

Ludwig Tieck, Der blonde Eckbert. ISBN: 978-3-15-007732-0 (about $5)

Annette von Droste-Hülshoff, Die Judenbuche. ISBN: 978-3-15-001858-3 (about $5)

 

GERMN 38503:  Advanced German Through Translation 3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: Two courses above GERMN 300 or equivalent (excluding courses in English translation).

Students will build their upper-level language proficiency by translating from German into English. We will discuss what it means to translate, as well as some theoretical issues of translation. On the whole, however, the course will be structured as a workshop: our discussion of vocabulary and grammar, the intricacies of German and English, and the art and science of translation will be based on the regular translation work students do with a variety of literary and non-literary texts.
Course requirements: Active participation, regular written translations, online translation portfolio
Textbooks:
None - This is a zero textbook cost course.


Courses Conducted in English

GERMN 241:  German Fairy Tales  "W"

Pre- or Coreq: ENGL 120 Fulfills the Creative Expression category of the Hunter Core.

Fairy tales are known all over the world. The most famous European book of fairy tales is the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. These stories have entered our collective unconscious but are not easily explained. We shall look at various attempts at explaining what fairy tales are all about, look at older stories that served as models for the Brothers Grimm and study modern versions of the tales including scenes from Walt Disney movies and "politically correct fairy tales." Students will read fairy tales, tell one that they know, and there will be regular written assignments, a midterm and final examination. All readings, discussions and written work will be in English. This course has a "W" designation.  

Course requirements: attendance and participation; regular preparation of readings; regular writing assignments. 
Exam Format: written midterm and final exams
Textbooks: 
Jack Zipes, The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 978-0553382167
Joanna Cole, Best-Loved Folktales of the World, ISBN 978-0318796482 or ISBN 9780385189491

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