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Courses Spring 2010

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Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses

 

GERMN 101: Elementary German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45 - 11:00 am
1247
You
509B West
02
Mon, Wed & Thurs
12:10 - 1:00 pm
1248
Libby
509B West
03
Mon & Wed
4:10 - 5:25 pm
1249
Staff
509B West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 102: Elementary German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon, Wed & Thurs
11:10 am - 12:00 pm
1250
Kasprzyk
509B West
02
Tues & Fri
11:10 am - 12:25 pm
1251
Beckett
611 West
03
Mon & Thurs
2:45 - 4:00 pm
1252
Libby
509B West
51
Tues & Thurs
5:35 - 6:50 pm
1253
Beckett
611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German I & II (6 hours, 6 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
51
Mon, Tues, Wed & Thurs 5:35 - 6:50 pm 1254 Zimmerman 509B West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 201: Intermediate German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
2:45 - 4:00 pm
1255
Kuhn-Osius
611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 202: Intermediate German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
1:10 - 2:25 pm
1256
Anderson
509B West
51
Tues & Thurs
7:00 - 8:15 pm
1257
Beckett
611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 203: Intensive Intermediate German I & II (6 hours, 6 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon, Wed & Thurs 11:10 - 1:00 pm 1258 Zimmerman 611 West
Click here for course description.


Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level I

(What is the difference between Level I and Level II courses?)

GERMN 302: Advanced German Conversation & Composition (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirement GER 3/A.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs
9:45 - 11:00 am
3930 Kuhn-Osius 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 320.57: Erich Kaestner (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs
1:10 - 2:25 pm
3965 Kuhn-Osius 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 339: German Drama from Naturalism to the Present (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Wed
4:10 - 5:25 pm
4413 Anderson 509B West
Click here for course description.


Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level II

(What is the difference between Level I and Level II courses?)

GERMN 382: Advanced Business German (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 312 or permission of the instructor. Fulfills requirement GER 3/A.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
51 Mon & Wed
5:35 - 6:50 pm
4412 Anderson 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 444.59: The Family Mann & Gender Roles (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: One course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or 444 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/C.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs
2:45 - 4:00 pm
3968
Nicolai 1441 West
Click here for course description.


Course in German Literature & Civilization (Conducted in English)

 

GERMN 241: German Fairy Tales (3 hours, 3 credits)
Fulfills requirements GER 2/C and PD/D and Writing.
Section
Day Time Code Instructor Room
01 Saturday
8:10 - 11:00 am
1259
Titze 611 West
Click here for course description.

 

 


What is the difference between Level I and Level II advanced courses?


The advanced German literature courses are divided into two levels. We expect students to take at least two literature courses at Level One (I) before proceeding to Level Two (II). If you are in any doubt which course you should take, please consult the Chairperson of the Department. All courses are conducted in German.

Level I courses are intended for students who have recently completed GERMN 202 or 203 and who only have limited experience in discussing German literature in German, orally and in writing. They are not intended for native speakers.

Level II courses are intended for advanced students who have taken a number of 300 level German language and literature courses and who may be interested in going on to use the German language professionally. They are thus meant to help students move to the highest level of the undergraduate program and beyond. Students enrolled in Level II courses have the opportunity to take the Zentrale Mittelstufenprüfung, the professional certificate of advanced language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. This exam is given each spring, and a fee set by the outside agency will be charged.

 

 

Course Descriptions


GERMN 101: Elementary German I

This course is for students without prior knowledge of German. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch I, ISBN 0-07-285376-x, currently $28.85


GERMN 102: Elementary German II

This course continues the work of GERMN 101. It broadens linguistic and cultural abilities for basic communication in a German-speaking environment. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch II, ISBN 0-07-3019364, currently $34.40


GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German I & II

This course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of German.  It covers in ONE semester the material normally covered in two semesters in GERMN 101 - 102. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch I and II, ISBN 0-07-285376-x and ISBN 0-07-3019364, currently $28.85 and $34.40


GERMN 201: Intermediate German I 

This course is the third in a four-semester sequence and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction to German. Review and practice of elementary grammar; introduction of advanced forms. Reading and discussion of selected German writings. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8, currently $41.55


GERMN 202: Intermediate German II

Continued broadening of abilities in speaking, listening, reading, writing. Reading and discussion of selected texts. Strong emphasis on active student participation. Regular attendance and daily homework  are important elements in this course. Completion of this course fulfills the Hunter College foreign language requirement.  Students at this level will normally be tested by both written and oral examination.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8, currently $41.55; a course package will also be distributed in class (currently $20.00)


GERMN 203: Intensive Intermediate German I & II

This course covers in ONE semester the material normally covered in TWO semesters, in GERMN 201 and GERMN 202. Instruction in the four basic skills is continued. Advanced grammatical forms are introduced. Selected literary texts are read and discussed. The class involves a considerable investment of time. Please consult the Chair of the Department for further advice about this accelerated course.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8, currently $41.55; a course package will also be distributed in class (currently $20.00)


GERMN 302: Advanced German Conversation & Composition

The course is designed to develop the conversational and compositional skills. There will be intensive practice of contemporary spoken and written German with emphasis on vocabulary and idiom, and on active mastery of grammatical forms. Taped material will be used to strengthen comprehension skills. Regular preparation in writing is required for group work and class dialogues. The course prepares the students to take the examination for the Zertifikate Deutsch, the professional certificate of basic language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. Fees charged by outside examining agencies will be announced to students at the beginning of the term.
Exam Format: written midterm and final examinations
Textbook: Themen neu Zertifikatsband, ISBN 3-19-301523-7, currently $29.75 (price subject to change)


GERMN 320.57: Erich Kaestner

Erich Kästner is one of Germany’s major 20th-century authors.  He grew up under the Kaiser, served in World War I, became a literary “shooting star” of the Weimar Republic, was not allowed to publish under the Nazis (who burned his books), and ended his life as a grand old man of letters in West Germany.  He is known for his classic children’s books, his biting satires, his uproariously funny adult novels, and his political commentary.  His writings have a light touch and accessible language which work well for students beginning their study of German literature.  Reading list:  An assortment of Kästner’s poems, Emil und die Detektive; Drei Männer im Schnee; either Fabian or Die verschwundene Miniatur; Die Konferenz der Tiere.  Time permitting, we will watch some film versions of his books. Class attendance and participation with individualized speaking assignments, bi-weekly papers of approx. 2 pages (with language corrections), a mid-term and a final examination.
Exam Format: written midterm and final exams


GERMN 339: German Drama from Naturalism to the Present

This course is intended for students who have recently completed GERMN 202 or 203.  In this course, we shall read and discuss German dramas of the late 19th and 20th centuries.  Three dramas will be selected from among those written by such dramatists as Hauptmann, Wedekind, Brecht, Dürrenmatt, and Frisch. Emphasis will be on close reading of texts, and analysis of form. The cultural and historical background of the period will also be discussed. The course will be conducted in German and there will be regular writing assignments in German. It is not intended for native speakers of German.
Exam Format: written midterm and final exams


GERMN 382: Advanced Business German (formerly GERMN 313)

This course is not intended for native speakers of German. The prerequisite for the course is GERMN 312 or permission of the instructor. Students interested in taking the course who do not meet this prerequisite should contact or email the instructor to arrange for, if necessary, a placement interview. Please call the German Department at 212 772-4980 or send an email to Professor Lisa Anderson at lan@hunter.cuny.edu. This course is a continuation of GERMN 312, Beginning Business German. We will work simultaneously on increasing the language needed in a business context and learning about business administration in Germany. We will also look at Germany as an important player in the global economy. Topics to be covered include structures of companies and corporations, employer/employee relationships, international management and marketing, and trade shows and fairs. We will work on speaking, listening, reading, and writing in German, and will build up cross-cultural awareness.
Textbook: German for Business and Economics, 2nd Edition by Patricia Ryan Paulsell and Anne-Katrin Gramberg, Michigan State University Press, 2000, ISBN-13: 9780870135385, currently $50.00. A CD-ROM accompanies the textbook.
Requirements: regular attendance in and preparation for class (reading and listening selections); regular written assignments (textbook exercises, business communications, a position paper). No late assignments accepted.
Exam Format: written midterm and final exams


GERMN 444.59: The Family Mann and Gender Roles & Homosexuality

In this course, we will examine the lives of two generations of the family of the famous German writer, Thomas Mann, as well as the fiction and non fiction works that they have produced.  In Germany, the outbreak of World War I and the later World War II destroyed the notion of bourgeois values creating a vacuum for a younger generation in search of new ideals, perspectives and orientations of life.  Gender roles were defined and redefined during this period and questions of sexual orientation were openly discussed.  For example, the attentive reader of Thomas Mann’s fiction finds only veiled hints about homosexuality, but this topic is explored in detail in writings of his eldest son, Klaus Mann and others of his literary generation who gathered in Berlin at the end of the Weimar Republic and went into exile after the Nazis’ came to power in 1933. The course will be conducted in German and all readings are in German.  The emphasis will be on talking and writing about literature in German. We shall try to build up the vocabulary and modes of expression needed for this kind of discourse. The precise amount of reading will be decided when the first writing samples from students have been analyzed by the instructor.  There will be a midterm and a final exam in this course.
Exam Format: written  midterm and final exams
Textbooks: Thomas Mann: Tod in Venedig, Fischer Taschenbuch, ISBN 3-596-11266-4, approx. $15. Thomas Mann: Tonio Kroeger. Mario und der Zauberer, Fischer Taschenbuch, ISBN 3-596-21381-9, approx. $9. Klaus Mann: Mephisto. Roman einer Karriere, Rororo Taschenbuch, ISBN 3-499-14821-8, approx. $10.50.


GERMN 241: German Fairy Tales

Fairy Tales are known all over the world. The most famous European book of fairy tales is the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. These stories have entered our collective unconscious but are not easily explained. We shall look at various attempts at explaining what fairy tales are all about, look at older stories that served as models for the Brothers Grimm and study modern versions of the tales down to a Walt Disney movie and “politically correct fairy tales”. Students will read fairy tales, tell one that they know, and write three short papers, a mid-term and final examination. All readings will be in English. This course has “W” designation.
Exam Format: written midterm and final exams
Textbooks:  Jack Zipes, The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 05-533-8216, currently $18.60. Joanna Cole, The Best Loved Fairy Tales of the World, ISBN 0-385-8949-0, currently $16.75

 

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement before registering for classes.

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