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Courses Fall 2014


Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses

 

GERMN 101: Elementary German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45am-
11:00am
13696
Merolle 509B West
02
Tues & Fri 11:10am-
12:25pm
13698 Koch 611 West
03
Mon & Thurs
2:45pm-
4:00pm
13697 Strohmeier 509B West
04 Mon & Thurs 4:10pm-
5:25pm
13699 Du Bey
509B West
05 Mon & Wed
5:35pm-
6:50pm
13700 Raninger 611 West
06 Tues & Thurs 7:00pm-
8:15pm
15690 Kasprzyk 509B West

Click here for course description. 

101 fulfills the "World Cultures" category of the Hunter Core.

 

GERMN 102: Elementary German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
9:45am-
11:00am
13702 Strohmeier 611 West
02
Tues & Fri 11:10am-
12:25pm
13703 Wicker 509B West
03 Tues & Fri 3:45pm-
5:00pm
13704 Wicker
509B West
04 Mon & Wed 5:35pm-
6:50pm
15691 Koch 509B West

Click here for course description

GERMN 102 counts towards the Hunter Focus.

 

GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German I & II (6 hours, 6 credits)
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 M, W, Th 11:10am-
1:00pm
13705 Wittenberg 509B West

Click here for course description.

GERMN 103 fulfills "World Cultures" of the Hunter Core and counts towards the Hunter Focus.

 

GERMN 201: Intermediate German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Tues & Fri
9:45am-
11:00am
15692 Wicker 509B West
02 Mon & Thurs 2:45pm-
4:00pm
13706 Wittenberg 611 West
03 Tues & Thurs 5:35pm-
6:50pm
13707 Kasprzyk 509B West

Click here for course description.

GERMN 201 counts towards the Hunter Focus.

 

GERMN 202: Intermediate German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01
Mon & Thurs
1:10pm-
2:25pm
13708 Merolle 611 West
02 Tues & Thurs 5:35pm-
6:50pm
15693 Anderson 611 West

Click here for course description.

GERMN 202 counts towards the Hunter Focus.

 


Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level I

(What is the difference between Level I and Level II courses?)

GERMN 301: Advanced German Comprehension & Conversation (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirement GER 3/A.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 1:10pm-
2:25pm
13712 Nicolai
509B West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 327: Modern Swiss Literature (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 2:45pm-
4:00pm
15686 Nicolai 1143 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 334: German Short Story & Novelle (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs
4:10pm-
5:25pm
15694 Anderson
611 West
Click here for course description.

 

Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level II

GERMN 342: The German Novel (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: One Course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or equivalent. Fulfills requirements GER 3/A  and PD/D.
Section
Days Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 1:10pm-
2:25pm
15695 Anderson 1143 West
Click here for course description.

 


Course in German Literature & Civilization (Conducted in English)

 

GERMN 240: German Thought & Culture (3 hours, 3 credits)
Pre-req- or Coreq: ENGL 120. Fulfills requirements GER 2/C and PD/D and Writing ("W").
Section
Day Time Code Instructor Room
01 Mon & Thurs 9:45am-
11:00am
13709 Tandler 1143 West
Click here for course description.

 

GERMN 241: German Fairy Tales (3 hours, 3 credits)
Pre- or Coreq: ENGL 120. Fulfills requirements GER 2/C and PD/D and Writing ("W").
Section
Day Time Code Instructor Room
01 Saturday 8:10am-
11:00am
13710 Titze 611 West
02 Mon & Thurs 8:10am-
9:25am
13711 Titze 611 West
03 Mon & Thurs 11:10am-
12:25pm
11978 Strohmeier 611 West

241 Fulfills the "Creative Expression" category of the Hunter core.

Click here for course description.

 

 


Course Descriptions


Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses


GERMN 101:  Elementary German I   3hrs, 3crs.

This course is for students without prior knowledge of German. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch I, ISBN 0-07-285376-x

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 102:  Elementary German II   3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent.

This course continues the work of GERMN 101. It broadens linguistic and cultural abilities for basic communication in a German-speaking environment. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch II, ISBN 0-07-3019364

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 103:  Intensive Elementary German I & II   3hrs, 3crs.

This course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of German.  It covers in ONE semester the material normally covered in two semesters, in GERMN 101-102.  It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch I and II, ISBN 0-07-285376-x; ISBN 0-07-3019364

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 201:  Intermediate German I    3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent.

This course is the third in a four-semester sequence and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction to German. Review and practice of elementary grammar; introduction of advanced forms. Reading and discussion of selected texts. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 202:  Intermediate German II    3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent.

Continued broadening of abilities in speaking, listening, reading, writing. Reading and discussion of selected literary texts. Strong emphasis on active student participation. Regular attendance and daily homework are important elements in this course. Completion of this course fulfills the Hunter College foreign language requirement. Students at this level will normally be tested by both written and oral examination.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German: Jägerbuch III, ISBN 0-07-24397-8; additional handouts

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

Advanced German Language, Literature & Culture Courses

 

 

What is the difference between Level I and Level II advanced courses?

The advanced German courses are divided into two levels.  We expect students to take at least two literature courses at Level I before proceeding to Level II.  If you are in any doubt as to which course you should take, or if you have previous knowledge of German, please consult the chair of the department. All of these courses are conducted in German. All 300-level courses in German plus 444 count as Focused Exposure Stage 3, Group A.

Level I courses are intended for students who have recently completed GERMN 202 or 203 and who have only limited experience discussing German literature in German, orally and in writing. They are not intended for native speakers.

Level II courses are intended for advanced students who have taken a number of 300-level German language and literature courses and who may be interested in going on to use the German language professionally. They are thus meant to help students move to the highest levels of the undergraduate program and beyond. Students enrolled in Level II courses have the opportunity to take the B2 and C1 exams, the professional certificates of advanced language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. The exams are given each spring. Fees charged by the Goethe Institute will be announced in advance.

 

GERMN 301:  Advanced German Comprehension & Conversation    3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. GER 3/A

The course is designed to develop the conversational and compositional skills. There will be intensive practice of contemporary spoken and written German with emphasis on vocabulary and idiom, and on active mastery of grammatical forms. Audio material will be used to strengthen comprehension skills. Regular preparation in writing is required for group work and class dialogues. The course prepares students to take the examination for the Zertifikat Deutsch, the professional certificate of basic language competence administered by the Goethe Institute. Fees charged by the Goethe Institute will be announced in advance.
Exam Format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: To be announced

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 327:  Modern Swiss Literature   3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq:  Germn 202 or 203 or equivalent. GER 3/A, PD/D

Switzerland is interesting in many respects. It is a confederation of 26 states with Berne as the “capital”. The country’s population has about eight million people and speaks German (66%), French (23%), Italian (8%) and Romansh (0.7%) which is a language that is based on Latin.  Situated in the heart of Europe, the nation did not take part in WWI or WW2. The history and the different cultures of Switzerland are presented in the rich body of its literature.     
In this course we will be dealing with literature written in German by the widely known authors Friedrich Dürrenmatt and Max Frisch – household names for Swiss Literature since the second half of the 20th century. We will also read some shorter pieces by less famous writers. Emphasis will be on close reading of the texts. Regular writing assignments in German will be tailored to individual needs and abilities (between 10 and 15 pages). Regular class preparation, completion of oral assignments for each class period, written midterm and final examinations will be required.
We will read two books; shorter texts will be presented as handouts:
Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Der Richter und sein Henker, ISBN 9783499101502 [about 9 Euro plus shipping]
Max Frisch, Homo Faber, ISBN 978-3-518-18803-3 [about 9 EUR plus shipping]

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 334:  The German Short Story & Novelle   3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. GER 3/A; PD/D This course is conducted in German.

Prereq:  GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent. GER 3/A, PD/D
In this course, we will read and discuss some of the best short prose that German literature has to offer: three novellas and 3-4 short stories from the late eighteenth century to the present. Authors include Goethe, Kafka, Tieck, Storm, Borchert, and Bachmann. We may also read a piece of contemporary short prose and discuss it with the author in person.
The primary goal of this course is to improve reading and listening comprehension, oral proficiency, and writing proficiency in German. The course is also designed to increase students’ familiarity with literary form, literary history, and German culture. This course is conducted in German, and there will be written assignments and exams in German.
Course requirements: Attendance and participation, written homework based on regular readings, essay.
Texts: Books will be ordered by the instructor directly, not through the bookstore.
Ludwig Tieck, Der blonde Eckbert. ISBN: 978-3-15-007732-0 (about $5)
Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Novelle. ISBN: 3-15-007621-8 (about $5)
Theodor Storm, Immensee. ISBN-3-15-006007-9 (about $5)

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.


GERMN 342 The German Novel   3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: One course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or 444 or equivalent or permission of instructor. GER 3/A, PD/D

Prereq: One course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or equivalent.  GER 3/A, PD/D
Students in this course will experience some of the most celebrated novels ever written in German. We will begin with J.W. von Goethe’s Die Leiden des jungen Werthers (1774), the epistolary novel that unleashed a storm of controversy and first established Goethe’s fame throughout Europe. We will then turn to Theodor Fontane’s adultery novel Effi Briest (1896), which Thomas Mann famously said would have to be included on even the most selective lists of great novels. Next we will consider one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century literature, Franz Kafka’s Der Prozeß (1925), which includes the famous parable “Vor dem Gesetz.” A fourth novel may be announced once the semester begins.
We will examine the historical and cultural background of each novel, as well as the careers of the authors. And we will study the form and history of the novel as a literary genre, especially in Germany. This course is conducted entirely in German.
Course requirements: attendance and participation; regular preparation of readings; significant essay writing; e-Portfolio.
Books will be ordered by the instructor directly, not through a bookstore. It is important that all students have the proper editions, in order to facilitate class discussion.
Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Die Leiden des jungen Werthers. ISBN: 978-3-15-018632-9
Theodor Fontane, Effi Briest. ISBN: 978-3-15-006961-5
Franz Kafka, Der Prozeß. ISBN: 3-596-12443-3
A fourth novel may be announced once the semester begins.

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 


Courses Conducted in English

 

GERMN 240:  German Thought and Culture    3hrs, 3crs

Pre-or Coreq: Engl 120. GER 2/C, PD/D, “W”

This course is an introduction to some of the most famous texts and ideas that have come to us from the German-speaking world. We will read (in English translation) and discuss the work of major writers in literary, philosophical, political and other fields, and will also consider developments in the fine arts. Throughout, we will consider these works in their historical context, from medieval Europe to Germany’s role in the world today. We will also explore the German cultural offerings in New York City today – at museums, theaters, musical performance venues, etc. Because this is a writing-intensive course, students will do significant writing and revising. 
Required textbook:
Hagen Schulze, Germany: A New History (Harvard, 1998). ISBN·0-67400545-7 or 0-674-80688-3.

Other assigned texts
and excerpts can be accessed free of charge on the Internet or will be distributed by the instructor:
•• Martin Luther, 95 Theses
•• Immanuel Kant, “What is Enlightenment?”
•• Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust (excerpts)
•• Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto (excerpts)
•• Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis (excerpts)
Course Requirements: Regular attendance and participation; regular reading and writing assignments, including papers; exams or final project.

 

 

GERMN 241:  German Fairy Tales    3hrs, 3crs.

Pre-or Coreq: Engl 120. GER 2/C, PD/D, "W"

Fairy tales are known all over the world. The most famous European book of fairy tales is the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. These stories have entered our collective unconscious but are not easily explained. We shall look at various attempts to explain what fairy tales are all about, look at older stories that served as models for the Brothers Grimm, and study modern versions of the tales, including a Walt Disney movie and “politically correct fairy tales.” Students will read fairy tales, tell one that they know, and write three short papers, a midterm and final examination. All readings, discussions and written work will be in English. This course has a “W” designation.
Exam format:
written midterm and final exams
Textbooks: Jack Zipes, The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 978-0553382167
Joanna Cole, The Best-Loved Fairy Tales of the World, ISBN 978-0318796482

 

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