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Part-Time Faculty

If the name of your instructor does not appear, please contact the History Department for additional details and contact information. Email is the preferred method for communication.

Name

Office

Email

Dr. Florence Asher HW 1549 fasher@hunter.cuny.edu
Mr. Andrew Battle HW 1545 andrew.battle@gmail.com 
Dr. Amanda Bellows amanda.b.bellows@gmail.com
Dr. Dillon Carroll HW 1545 dillonjc@uga.edu
Mr. Michael Crowder HW 1545 mcrowder@gradcenter.cuny.edu
Dr. Rebecca Dresser HW 1545 rdresser@hunter.cuny.edu
Dr. Noah Gelfand HW 1545 noah.gelfand@nyu.edu
Dr. Sandor S. John
HW1545 s_an@msn.com
Dr. Florene Memegalos HW1549 fmemegal@hunter.cuny.edu
Mr. Nathan Melson HW 1545 nsmelson@gmail.com
Dr. Philip Ranlet HW 1545 pranlet@hunter.cuny.edu
Mr. Luke Reynolds HW 1545 lreynolds@gradcenter.cuny.edu
Dr. Bruce Ruben HW 1546 bruben@hunter.cuny.edu
Dr. Ari Sclar HW 1545 asclar@hunter.cuny.edu
Mr. Ky Woltering HW 1545 kwoltering1@gmail.com

 Dr. Florence Asher
Ph.D. CUNY Graduate Center

Research and teaching interests:

Florence Asher teaches both sections of the American History survey. She graduated from Vanderbilt University with a B.A., majoring in English with minors in European history and Philosophy. Afterwards, she earned an MLS from George Peabody College and worked as a librarian. Once in New York, Florence became a buyer and merchandise manager for a leading footwear retailer. She moved on to become Senior Editor of an apparel trade publication, covering the footwear industry. Florence left footwear and transitioned to American Folk Art. She received an MA from New York University in Folk Art Studies. She taught at NYU before deciding to study history to build on her interest in utopian communities. She received an MPhil and PhD in American history from the CUNY Graduate Center. Her dissertation examines women, welath and power in the late nineteenth century. At the beginning of each semester, Florence tells her students that failure is never an option. Just go for it!


 Andy Battle
Ph.D. Candidate in US History, CUNY Graduate Center



Research and teaching interests:

Andy Battle is a doctoral candidate in US History at the CUNY Graduate Center and an adjunct lecturer in US History at Hunter College. He teaches survey courses on US History and graduate courses in the Teacher Education Program. His research interests include cities, deindustrialization, and global political economy. He is currently working on a dissertation about the deindustrialization of New York City. He is also the graduate assistant for the Labor and Working-Class History Seminar at Roosevelt House.


 Dr. Amanda Bellows
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



Amanda Bellows studies the history of the United States in comparative and transnational perspective. She earned her Ph.D. in History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her writing has appeared in the Journal of Global Slavery, Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, the Journal of the Civil War Era, the Southern Humanities Review, the New York Times, Talking Points Memo, and the books New York Times Disunion: A History of the Civil War and Disunion: Modern Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from Lincoln's Election to the Emancipation Proclamation.

Research interests:

U.S. and Russian history, comparative and transnational slavery/emancipation, the Civil War era, memory, literature, art, and popular culture.

Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

“Post-Emancipation Representations of Serfs, Peasants, Slaves, and Freedpeople in Russian and American National Art, 1861—1905.” New Literary Observer/Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 6/2016: 7-25

“Selling Servitude, Captivating Consumers: Images of Bondsmen in American and Russian Advertisements, 1880—1915.” Journal of Global Slavery, 1/1: 72-112 (2016).

Book Contributions

“How the Civil War Created Football,” in The New York Times Disunion: A History of the Civil War. Edited by Ted Widmer. New York: Oxford University Press, 331-334.

“No Language Like Song,” in Disunion: Modern Scholars and Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from Lincoln’s Election to the Emancipation Proclamation. Edited by Ted Widmer. New York: New York Times and Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, 2013, 205-208.

Web-Based Publications

“The First Great African-American Filmmaker: Before Spike Lee and John Singleton, there was Oscar Micheaux,” Talking Points Memo, August 18, 2016, available here.

“How the Civil War Created College Football,” New York Times, January 2, 2016, available here.

“Author, Author!” New York Times, March 16, 2016, available here.

“No Language Like Song,” New York Times, September 16, 2011, available here.


 Dr. Dillon J. Carroll
Ph.D, University of Georgia (2016)



Research interests:

Dillon Carroll researches and writes about the social, cultural, medical and gender history of the Civil War Era. He is currently at work on a forthcoming book with Louisiana State University Press on mentally ill Civil War veterans during and after the war. He has previously been published in the New York Times, Civil War History Journal, and various online platforms. His next project focuses on African American Civil War veterans in the Gilded Age.

Publications:

Invisible Wounds: Veterans of the American Civil War in the Gilded Age, under advanced contract with Louisiana State University Press.

“‘The God Who Shielded Me Before Yet Watches Over Us All’: Confederate Soldiers, Mental Illness, and Religion,” Civil War History Vol. 61 No. 3 (September, 2015)

“The Case of Napoleon Perkins,” in David Seed, Chris Williams and Stephen C. Kenney, eds., Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2015)

Personal Website:

www.dillonjcarroll.com


 Dr. Noah L. Gelfand
Ph.D., New York University (2008)



Research and teaching interests:

Noah L. Gelfand is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, where he teaches both halves of the US survey course. He received his BA in History from the University of Connecticut and his MA in US History from San Francisco State University. While studying Atlantic History at New York University, he received numerous grants, including a Quinn Foundation fellowship from the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and a Touro National Heritage Trust fellowship from the John Carter Brown Library. In 2008, he graduated from New York University with a PhD in Atlantic History and US History to 1877. Gelfand has published several articles and book chapters on Atlantic history, including “Jacob Leisler: A Life and Death in the Atlantic World, 1640-1691,” in The Human Tradition in the Atlantic World and “To Live and Trade: The Status of Sephardi Mercantile Communities in the Atlantic Word During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries,” in Caribbean Jewry. He is currently working on a book about the Jewish Atlantic world in the early modern era.


 Luke A.L. Reynolds
Ph.D. Candidate in European History at the CUNY Graduate Center



Research and teaching interests:

Luke Reynolds is a Ph.D. Candidate in European History at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His areas of interest are the social, cultural, imperial, and military histories of Great Britain in the nineteenth century. He is currently at work on his dissertation "Wellington's Veterans: The British Officer Corps in the Pax Britannica." He teaches History 151 and 122.

Personal website:

www.lukealreynolds.com


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