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Comprehensive Exam Bibliographies

 

1. The COMPREHENSIVE EXAM for teacher education students and the FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM for MA students will be held on (TBA) in the history dept conference room. Students have 3 hours for the TEP exam and 90 minutes for the language exam. In order to register for the exams, contact Prof Rosenberg via e-mail: jonathan.rosenberg@aol.com

TEP - Social Studies: United States history

TEP - Social Studies: Non-U.S./World history

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR MA STUDENTS IN HISTORY: THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMS IN HISTORY HAVE BEEN ELIMINATED AS A REQUIREMENT BY THE DEPARTMENT. MA STUDENTS IN HISTORY ARE NO LONGER REQUIRED TO TAKE THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAM TO GRADUATE. THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM REMAINS A REQUIREMENT.

THE EXAM FOR THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM REMAINS AS A REQUIREMENT.


M.A. - T.E.P. in Adolescence Education

Note to students in the Teachers of Adolescent Education – Social Studies Program:

The history department has changed the comprehensive exam for students in the Teachers of Adolescent Education – Social Studies Program. The new exam, which will have two parts rather than three, will be given for the first time in fall 2010.

One part of the revised exam will focus on U.S. History and the other part will focus on themes and areas distinct from the United States. The exam, which will be given twice a year, will require students to write two essays, one on U.S. history and the other on non-U.S. history. The essay questions will draw on the revised reading lists, which are available on the department Web-site. One reading list focuses on U.S. history, the other on the non-U.S. field. In writing the exam essays, students are expected to be conversant in the literature on the reading lists and to cite works from both lists. If there are any questions about the readings or the revised exam, the history department encourages students to speak with members of the history faculty.

United States history (rev. 04/10)

Bibliography

The current theme for Fall exam is: FREEDOM.

READING LIST FOR THE US SECTION OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION EXAM (REVISED MAY 2013). This list will be in effect for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years. TEP exam dates for the Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 semesters have not yet been announced.

Note: as an introductory text, read Eric Foner, THE STORY OF AMERICAN FREEDOM.

I. EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY

Ira Berlin and Ronald Hoffman, eds., SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

Mark Kruman, BETWEEN AUTHORITY AND LIBERTY: STATE CONSTITUTION-MAKING IN REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA.

Edmund Morgan, AMERICAN SLAVERY, AMERICAN FREEDOM: THE ORDEAL OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA.

Gary Nash, THE UNKNOWN AMERICAN REVOLUTION: THE UNRULY BIRTH OF DEMOCRACY AND THE STRUGGLE TO CREATE AMERICA.

II. SPEECH

Geoffrey R. Stone, PERILOUS TIMES: FREE SPEECH IN WARTIME FROM THE SEDITION ACT OF 1798 TO THE WAR ON TERROR.

Richard Polenberg, FIGHTING FAITHS: THE ABRAMS CASE, THE SUPREME COURT, AND FREE SPEECH.

Richard W. Steele, FREE SPEECH IN THE GOOD WAR.

Ellen Schrecker, MANY ARE THE CRIMES: McCARTHYISM IN AMERICA.

Mary Dudziak, WAR TIME: AN IDEA, ITS HISTORY, ITS CONSEQUENCES.

III. LABOR, RACE, ETHNICITY

James Green, DEATH IN THE HAYMARKET: A STORY OF CHICAGO, THE FIRST LABOR MOVEMENT, AND THE BOMBING THREAT THAT DIVIDED GILDED AGE AMERICA.

Nelson Lichtenstein, STATE OF THE UNION: A CENTURY OF AMERICAN LABOR.

Stephen Pitti, THE DEVIL IN SILICON VALLEY: NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, RACE, AND MEXICAN AMERICANS.

Seth Rockman, SCRAPING BY: WAGE LABOR, SLAVERY, AND SURVIVAL IN EARLY BALTIMORE.

Thomas Sugrue, THE ORIGINS OF THE URBAN CRISIS: RACE AND INEQUALITY IN POSTWAR DETROIT.

Mae Ngai, IMPOSSIBLE SUBJECTS: ILLEGAL ALIENS AND THE MAKING OF MODERN AMERICA.

IV. AFRICAN-AMERICAN FREEDOM STRUGGLE

Philip A. Klinkner with Rogers Smith, THE UNSTEADY MARCH: THE RISE AND DECLINE OF RACIAL EQUALITY IN AMERICA, chs. 3-9.

Patricia Sullivan, DAYS OF HOPE: RACE AND DEMOCRACY IN THE NEW DEAL ERA.

Michael Klarman, FROM JIM CROW TO CIVIL RIGHTS: THE SUPREME COURT AND THE STRUGGLE FOR RACIAL EQUALITY.

William Chafe, CIVILITIES AND CIVIL RIGHTS: GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA AND THE BLACK STRUGGLE FOR FREEDOM.

Clayborn Carson, IN STRUGGLE: SNCC AND THE BLACK AWAKENING OF THE 1960S

Essays by Steven E. Lawson and Charles Payne in DEBATING THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.

V. HISTORY OF SEXUALITY

George Chauncey, GAY NEW YORK: GENDER, URBAN CULTURE, AND THE MAKINGS OF THE GAY MALE WORLD, 1890-1945.

Elizabeth Clement, LOVE FOR SALE: COURTING, TREATING, AND PROSTITUTION IN NEW YORK CITY, 1900-1945.

David Johnson, THE LAVENDER SCARE: THE COLD WAR PRESECUTION OF GAYS AND LESBIANS IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.

Danielle McGuire, AT THE DARK END OF THE STREET: BLACK WOMEN, RAPE, AND RESISTANCE: A NEW HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.


M.A. - T.E.P. in Adolescence Education, Non-U.S./World

Note to students: Central to modern history is the belief that nations and nationalism are an immutable part of the human experience. This belief has been consistently resilient over the last few centuries. This insistence on the persistence of the national model was particularly evident in 1989 when the fall of the Berlin Wall presented us with a new world view of a world order of nation-states freed from the grip of the Soviets and on the road to self-determination. History has shown that this has not been a smooth process, but has been filled with violence and separateness that has often divided rather than unified. Irrespective of post 1989 political chaos, however, nationalism as a bond of communal identity continues to define the discourse of leaders who are either calling for the territorial status quo, or demanding the rights of minorities to build their own states with their own territorial integrity. 

The persistence of the belief that the nation is the most perfect form of political organization was not always central to historical consciousness. Historians have shown, quite decisively, that nations and nationalism was a created process. But historians disagree about when and where nations were created, and by whom? They also disagree about even more fundamental questions, such as what is a ‘nation’, a ‘people’, and a ‘society’? What influences do history, language, geographical borders, political structures, gender, and minority rights have on nation formation? What is the role of the nation in the perpetuation of some of the most horrific and violent acts in modern history? Are nations still necessary or is there another possible model for political organization in a globalizing world?

The books listed below present important secondary works that address these questions. In addition, a number of important primary sources—essential readings for teachers of world history—are contained in Dahbour and Ishay. The list below outlines the development of nations and nationalism by examining the theories of the leading historians, political scientists, and sociologists, and discusses the many factors that were present and necessary in the creation of nation-states. They address theoretical debates and questions, as well as case studies, and argue what the future holds for nationalist model. In the exam essay, students should be familiar with, and prepared to discuss in detail, the historiographical theories of the various authors, as well as how the agree or disagree with each other. They should also be prepared to answer questions about the basic arguments surrounding the influence of history, language, borders, political structure, gender and minority rights on nation formation. Students are encouraged to look for other critical essays in order to supplement and expand upon the works on this list. Passing essays are expected to reflect a command of all the works listed below. Reference to other relevant works not on the list is also encouraged, but not required.

Bibliography

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities. Reflections on the Origins and Spread of Nationalism (London: Verso, 2006).

John Breuilly, Nationalism and the State (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994).

Chatterjee, Partha, The Nation and Its Fragments. Colonial and Postcolonial Histories (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993).

Omar Dahbour and Micheline R. Ishay (eds.), The Nationalism Reader (Humanity Press, 1999). This volume contains essential primary source readings.

Ernest Gellner and John Breuilly, Nations and Nationalism (New Perspectives on the Past) (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2009).

Dru C. Gladney (ed), Making Majorities. Constituting the Nation in Japan, Korea, China, Malaysia, Fiji, Turkey, and the United States (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998).

Haldun Gülalp (ed), Citizenship and Ethnic Conflict (London: Routledge, 2006).

E.J. Hobsbawn, Nations and Nationalism Since 1780. Programme, Myth, Reality (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992).

Michael Ignatieff, Blood and Belonging. Journeys into the New Nationalism (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1995).

Elie Kedourie, Nationalism (Oxford: Blackwell, 1993).

Will Kymlicka, The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997).

Umut Ozk?r?ml?, Theories of Nationalism. A Critical Review (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000).

Anthony D. Smith, Nationalism and Modernism. A Critical Survey of Recent Theories of Nations and Nationalism (London: Routledge, 1998).

 

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