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Comprehensive Exam Bibliographies

 

1. The COMPREHENSIVE EXAM for teacher education students and the FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM for MA students will be held on (TBA) in the history dept conference room. Students have 3 hours for the TEP exam and 90 minutes for the language exam. In order to register for the exams, contact Prof Rosenberg via e-mail: jonathan.rosenberg@aol.com

TEP - Social Studies: United States history

TEP - Social Studies: Non-U.S./World history

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR MA STUDENTS IN HISTORY: THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMS IN HISTORY HAVE BEEN ELIMINATED AS A REQUIREMENT BY THE DEPARTMENT. MA STUDENTS IN HISTORY ARE NO LONGER REQUIRED TO TAKE THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAM TO GRADUATE. THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM REMAINS A REQUIREMENT.

THE EXAM FOR THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM REMAINS AS A REQUIREMENT.


M.A. - T.E.P. in Adolescence Education

Note to students in the Teachers of Adolescent Education – Social Studies Program:

The history department has changed the comprehensive exam for students in the Teachers of Adolescent Education – Social Studies Program. The new exam, which will have two parts rather than three, will be given for the first time in fall 2010.

One part of the revised exam will focus on U.S. History and the other part will focus on themes and areas distinct from the United States. The exam, which will be given twice a year, will require students to write two essays, one on U.S. history and the other on non-U.S. history. The essay questions will draw on the revised reading lists, which are available on the department Web-site. One reading list focuses on U.S. history, the other on the non-U.S. field. In writing the exam essays, students are expected to be conversant in the literature on the reading lists and to cite works from both lists. If there are any questions about the readings or the revised exam, the history department encourages students to speak with members of the history faculty.

United States history (rev. 04/10)

Bibliography

The current theme for Fall exam is: FREEDOM.

READING LIST FOR THE US SECTION OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION EXAM (REVISED MAY 2013). This list will be in effect for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years. TEP exam dates for the Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 semesters have not yet been announced.

Note: as an introductory text, read Eric Foner, THE STORY OF AMERICAN FREEDOM.

I. EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY

Ira Berlin and Ronald Hoffman, eds., SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

Mark Kruman, BETWEEN AUTHORITY AND LIBERTY: STATE CONSTITUTION-MAKING IN REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA.

Edmund Morgan, AMERICAN SLAVERY, AMERICAN FREEDOM: THE ORDEAL OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA.

Gary Nash, THE UNKNOWN AMERICAN REVOLUTION: THE UNRULY BIRTH OF DEMOCRACY AND THE STRUGGLE TO CREATE AMERICA.

II. SPEECH

Geoffrey R. Stone, PERILOUS TIMES: FREE SPEECH IN WARTIME FROM THE SEDITION ACT OF 1798 TO THE WAR ON TERROR.

Richard Polenberg, FIGHTING FAITHS: THE ABRAMS CASE, THE SUPREME COURT, AND FREE SPEECH.

Richard W. Steele, FREE SPEECH IN THE GOOD WAR.

Ellen Schrecker, MANY ARE THE CRIMES: McCARTHYISM IN AMERICA.

Mary Dudziak, WAR TIME: AN IDEA, ITS HISTORY, ITS CONSEQUENCES.

III. LABOR, RACE, ETHNICITY

James Green, DEATH IN THE HAYMARKET: A STORY OF CHICAGO, THE FIRST LABOR MOVEMENT, AND THE BOMBING THREAT THAT DIVIDED GILDED AGE AMERICA.

Nelson Lichtenstein, STATE OF THE UNION: A CENTURY OF AMERICAN LABOR.

Stephen Pitti, THE DEVIL IN SILICON VALLEY: NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, RACE, AND MEXICAN AMERICANS.

Seth Rockman, SCRAPING BY: WAGE LABOR, SLAVERY, AND SURVIVAL IN EARLY BALTIMORE.

Thomas Sugrue, THE ORIGINS OF THE URBAN CRISIS: RACE AND INEQUALITY IN POSTWAR DETROIT.

Mae Ngai, IMPOSSIBLE SUBJECTS: ILLEGAL ALIENS AND THE MAKING OF MODERN AMERICA.

IV. AFRICAN-AMERICAN FREEDOM STRUGGLE

Philip A. Klinkner with Rogers Smith, THE UNSTEADY MARCH: THE RISE AND DECLINE OF RACIAL EQUALITY IN AMERICA, chs. 3-9.

Patricia Sullivan, DAYS OF HOPE: RACE AND DEMOCRACY IN THE NEW DEAL ERA.

Michael Klarman, FROM JIM CROW TO CIVIL RIGHTS: THE SUPREME COURT AND THE STRUGGLE FOR RACIAL EQUALITY.

William Chafe, CIVILITIES AND CIVIL RIGHTS: GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA AND THE BLACK STRUGGLE FOR FREEDOM.

Clayborn Carson, IN STRUGGLE: SNCC AND THE BLACK AWAKENING OF THE 1960S

Essays by Steven E. Lawson and Charles Payne in DEBATING THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.

V. HISTORY OF SEXUALITY

George Chauncey, GAY NEW YORK: GENDER, URBAN CULTURE, AND THE MAKINGS OF THE GAY MALE WORLD, 1890-1945.

Elizabeth Clement, LOVE FOR SALE: COURTING, TREATING, AND PROSTITUTION IN NEW YORK CITY, 1900-1945.

David Johnson, THE LAVENDER SCARE: THE COLD WAR PRESECUTION OF GAYS AND LESBIANS IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.

Danielle McGuire, AT THE DARK END OF THE STREET: BLACK WOMEN, RAPE, AND RESISTANCE: A NEW HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.


M.A. - T.E.P. in Adolescence Education, Non-U.S./World

Bibliography

Lynn Hunt, INVENTING HUMAN RIGHTS

Bonny Ibhawo, IMPERIALISM AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Akira Iriye, ed.,  THE HUMAN RIGHTS REVOLUTION

Roger Normand and Sarah Zaidi, HUMAN RIGHTS AT THE UN

Carol Anderson, EYES OFF THE PRIZE

Jeffrey Wasserstrom, et. al., eds.,  HUMAN RIGHTS AND REVOLUTIONS

Upendra Baxi, THE FUTURE OF HUMAN RIGHTS

Samuel Moyn, THE LAST UTOPIA

Stefan-Ludwig Hoffman,  HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

Roland Burke,    DECOLONIZATION AND THE EVOLUTION OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

Lydia Liu, “SHADOWS OF UNIVERSALISM” http://criticalinquiry.uchicago.edu/uploads/pdf/Liu_1948.pdf

Sam Moyn, “THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS OF 1948 IN THE HISTORY OF COSMOPOLITANISM” http://www.law.tau.ac.il/Heb/_Uploads/dbsAttachedFiles/Moyn1948.pdf

Jan Eckel and Sam Moyn, eds.,  THE BREAKTHROUGH: HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE 1970'S

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