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Fall 2011 Course Schedule

Note: All Honors College students must take four honors classes (in addition to the MHC seminars) in their four years at Hunter College.

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Glick

Section 900        W:  3:10-5:40                                                                                            Code # 2017             HNC110

 

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Graff

Section 901    W 2:55-5:25                   
Code #    2018        HN 405   

 

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Klich

Section 902    W 10:10-12:40                   
Code #    2019        HN C 1602                   

 

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Lesser   

Section 903    W 3:10-5:40               
Code #    2020        HN C111   

 

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Klich

Section 904    TH 2:10-4:40                           
Code #    2021        HN C1602   

 

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC      Prof. Meyers-Kingsley   

Section 905    T 10:10-12:40                   
Code #    2022        HN C112       

 

MHC 200    MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology    Prof.  Garson

Section 900    T, F 9:45-11:00                    
Code #    2023        HN C113    

 

MHC 200    MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology    Prof. Dalton

Section 901    W 10:10-1:00                   
Code #    2024        HW 407       

 

MHC 200     MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology                             Prof. Marcotullio

Section 902    T, F 9:45-11:00                           
Code #    2025        HW 207   

 

MHC 200     MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology  
Prof. Marcotullio

Section 903    T, F 2:10-3:25                               
Code #    2026        HW 207       

 

MHC 200     MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology 
Prof. Alexandratos

Section 904    M, TH 1:10-2:25                           
Code #    2027        HN C111   

 

ANTHC 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology    Prof. Susser

Section 900    Lecture W 12:10-1:00         HW 714       
Code#0106    Lecture TH 12:10-1:00        HW 615
Recitation M 8:10-9:00           HN 710

Note:  Fulfills GER Stage 2(B) and P & D (A)

 

ANTHC 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology    Prof. Susser

Section 901    Lecture W 12:10-1:00         HW 714   
Code#0107    Lecture TH 12:10-1:00        HW 615
Recitation M 9:10-10:00          HN 710

Note:  Fulfills GER Stage 2(B) and P & D (A)

 

BIOL 100    Principles of Biology I

Note:  This is not an Honors College class; you will not receive credit for an Honors College class.  These sections, however, are reserved for Honors College students:

Section 001    Recitation: M        08:00-08:50 HN C114
Lab            M     09:00-12:00 HN 812    
Lecture       TU     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
        TH     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
    CODE#0341
   
Section 006    Recitation: W        08:00-08:50 HN C114
Lab            W     09:00-12:00 HN 815    
Lecture       TU     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
        TH     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
    CODE#0346                                                                                                                                                              Section 007    Recitation: TH    08:00-08:50 HN C114
Lab            TH     09:00-12:00 HN 812    
Lecture       TU     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
        TH     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
    CODE#0347

Please see your advisor if you want to register for one of these sections.

 

CHM 102        General Chemistry--Lecture

Section 900        T, F 9:10-11:00     HN Assembly Hall
Code#4958        M 2:10-3:00        HW 217

Note:  This section is part of the regular Chemistry 102 lecture; it does not count as an Honors College class.  This code simply guarantees spaces for Honors College students in the recitation on Mondays from 2:10-3:00.   

    Fulfills GER 2(E).   4 Credits.

 

CHM 102        General Chemistry--Lecture

Section 901        T, F 9:10-11:00     HN Assembly Hall
Code#4960        TH 2:10-3:00        HW 217

Note:  This section is part of the regular Chemistry 102 lecture; it does not count as an Honors College class.  This code simply guarantees spaces for Honors College students in the recitation on Thursdays from 2:10-3:00.

    Fulfills GER 2(E).   4 Credits.

 

CHM 111        Chemical Principles       

Section 900        T, W, F 9:10-11:00 (lecture and recitation) HW 511
Code#0611        F 12:10-4:00 (lab) HN 1412S

  

Note:  This course is 5.5 credits.   Fulfills GER 2(E)

 

CSCI 135    Software Analysis and Design            Prof. Brizan

Section 900        M, TH 2:45-4:00
Code #4798        HW 413        3 Credits

        Prerequisite:  CSCI 127 or equivalent
        N.B.:  Students must also register for CSCI 136

 

CSCI 136    Software Analysis and Design—Supervised Programming Lab                            Prof. Brizan

Section 900        M 12:10-2:00
Code #4799        HN 1000G            1 credit

 

ENG 120     Expository Writing                Prof. Hayden

Section 900         M, TH 1:10-2:25        3 credits
Code#1070        HW 509A        

 

ENG 120     Expository Writing                Prof. Robbins

Section 901         T, F 11:10-12:25        3 credits
Code#1071        TH 502           

 

ENG 220     Introduction to Literature            Prof. Brown

Section 900         T, TH 4:10-5:25        3 credits       
Code#1112        HW 207           

 

ENG 329.75    Writing the New South Africa        Prof. Shute

Section 900         T, F 2:10-3:25               
Code#4588        HW 407

Prerequisite is English 220.  May be used to satisfy one of the following: Literature, Language, Criticism core requirement “E,“ area of study “E,” 3 or elective; Writing core requirement “C”;  Adolescence Education core requirement “G”; English Language Arts elective.

This course will explore South African literature both before and after the end of apartheid, with particular attention to problems of narrativity and storytelling posed by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Texts will include works of fiction and nonfiction, as well as recent documentary and feature films.  We will read established authors such as J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Andre Brink, Zakes Mda, Damon Galgut, and Antjie Krog, along with emerging writers of the post-apartheid era.  Requirements will include a midterm exam and a research paper.

 

ENG 355.54    Shakespeare:  The Poet and His Contemporaries 
Prof. Schmidgall

Section 900        M, TH 1:10-2:25       
Code# 4597        HW 407

Prerequisite is English 220.  May be used to satisfy one of the following:  Literature, Language, and Criticism core requirement “B” or area of study “A”; Creative Writing core requirement “A”; Adolescence Education core requirement “E”; English Language Arts elective. Approved course for Stage 3– Focused Exposure Group C Pluralism and Diversity.

This course in late 16th- and early 17th-century British poetry will be centered on Shakespeare, focusing in particular on the Sonnets, the long erotic poem Venus and Adonis, and on his great comedy about lovers, poets and poetizing, Love’s Labors Lost. We will look at some earlier poets whose work prepared for the “golden age” of 1590-1610 (Wyatt and Sidney), then later sample the work of Shakespeare’s three great contemporaries, Christopher Marlowe (notably his Hero and Leander), John Donne and Ben Jonson.  Blackboard will be an active part of the course. There will be four papers, midterm and final exams.

 

ENG 390.76    Understanding the 1960s: Literature, Politics, and Culture        Prof. Goldstein

Section 900        F 3:45-6:15       
Code#5418         TH 412

 

HIST 250.03    The World of the Bible          Prof. Seltzer

Section 900         M/TH 11:10-12:25           
Code#     5345        HW 1543

The Bible is a library of works that reflect more than one thousand years of ancient history and that still has meaning for our time.  It is a collection of many kinds of writing—history, law, poetry, wisdom, etc.—that drew on even more ancient civilizations of the Middle East from Mesopotamia and Egypt up to Hellenistic and Roman times and treated them critically and with great originality.  Biblical thought cover many great themes of human self-exploration: why there is a universe and how it came into being, what is the ultimate goal of history and why it full of turmoil, what are the supreme values of life, the meaning of collective and individual suffering, the relation of faith, revelation, and spiritual redemption.  How the biblical writings came in to be written down has to be set against social turmoil, military upheavals, and power politics.  The Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) became the ground of ancient Christianity and rabbinic Judaism (and indirectly Islam).  Study of “the biblical world’ is world history in miniature.  Course readings will be from the Bible and from modern critical scholarship.  No prior religious knowledge is required but a student who does have some background should find it challenged by the historical analysis of this course.

 

HIST 492.09    The Dryfus Affair            Prof. Schor

Section 900        W 10:10-1:00
Code#5298        HW 1441

The Dreyfus Affair was called the Trial of the Century. Much as the Scopes Trial in the United States, the Dreyfus trial in France captured the attention of millions of people, dividing them into two camps—Dreyfusards and anti-Dreyfusards. A detailed study of the trial opens a window into French history as the belle époque drew to a close and years of war and depression loomed. It is also an opportunity to study Jewish history as a century of civil rights for French Jews was followed by a century of anti-Semitism and mass murder. Finally, study of this trial raises broader questions about military justice and military secrets, the role of a free press, and the role of intellectuals in controversial times. 

First-year students need the instructor’s permission to sign up.

 

ITAL 260        The Modern Italian Short Story      Prof. Paynter

Section 900        M/TH 11:10-12:25        3 cr   
Code#1710        HN 509c   

NOTE:  This course is conducted in English, and fulfills GER 2/C and P& D (D).  Prerequisite:  English 120 or the equivalent.

 

MEDP 292        Basic Reporting                Prof. Stein

Section 900        M 10:10-1:00     
Code #5374        HN 470

 

MUSHL 101    Introduction to Music            Prof. Coppola

Section 900        T/F 11:10-12:25           
Code#2065        HN 406

        GER 2D and P & D (D)

 

PHIL 103          Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking   
Prof. Freeman

Section 900        M, W, TH 11:10-12:00
Code#4695        HW 505   
        GER 2C

 

POLSC 100    Introduction to Political Science:  Democracy, Anarchy, and the State    Profs. Jenkins, Marasco, and Roberts

Section 900    Lecture:  T/F 10:10-11:00     HW 615
Code#5426    Discussion:  T 11:10-12:00    HE 922

        GER 2B
        Open only to first year students

 

POLSC 110 (W) American Government            Prof. Polsky

Section 900        M, TH 11:10-12:00 (lecture)     HW 714   
Code#2417        TH 12:10-1:00 (discussion)      HW 1731
   
        GER 1C or GER 2B
        Not open to students who have taken POLSC 111
        Pre- or Corequisite:  English 120

 

POLSC 202          Modern Political Thought 1600-1900   Prof. Wallach

Section 900        T/F 9:45-11:00
Code #2424        HW 1729

GER 3B and P/D (D)
        Pre-requisite:  English 120

 

POLSC 270    International Relations:  Conceptual Foundations and Current Events              Prof. Holt-Dwyer

Section 900        M, Th 1:10-2:25       
Code#2449        HW 1729

Note:  This is a core course for those students interested in concentrating in International Relations in Political Science.  It is also a prerequisite for most 300-level International Relations courses.  Not open to students who have passed POLSC 115.  Students may not receive credit for both POLSC 115 and POLSC 270. 
GER 2B

 

POLSC 373.89    Global Power Shifts:  Rising Powers, The United States, and the World Order           Prof. Roberts   

Section 900        T, F 12:45-2:00
Code#5014        HW 1731

Note:  Fulfills GER 3(B).

 

PSYCH 100       Introduction to Psychology            TBD

Section 900        M, TH 2:45-4:00                        
Code#2509        HN C111       

    GER 2B

 

PSYCH 390.45 - PSYCHOSOCIAL HEALTH OF LATINA WOMEN
                                 Dr. Iris Zavala-Martinez

Section 900        M, TH 9:45-11:00
Code#    5308        HW 412

This course will examine the growing Latina/Puerto Rican population in the United States and the salient psychosocial issues that affect her health.  We will look at the complexities of race, culture, language, class, age, generational status, amongst others that have been shown to relate to her psychosocial health.  The differences among Latina groups will be noted as well as challenges and conflicts.  We will resort to engaged forms of scholarship and project based learning strategies to enhance the participatory educational process.    

Note:  This is a master’s-level course.  Prerequisites: ENGL 120, PSYCH 248, PSYCH 249 OR 250 AND A DECLARED PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR. NEW CURRENT MAJORS MUST HAVE COMPLETED 1 SEMESTER OF AN APPROVED SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

STAT 213    Introduction to Applied Statistics        TBD

Section 900         T, F 8:10-9:25                      
Code#2988             HW 408

        GER 1B

 

THEA 161    Acting I:  Basic Acting Techniques        TBD

Section 900        M, TH 11:10-12:25
Code #    5328        TH Basement

 

WGS 100     Introduction to Women’s Studies        Prof. Delorenzo

Section 900    T, F 3:45-5:00
Code#3116    HN C114

    GER 2B and P & D (C)