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Fall 2010 Course Schedule

Updated 5.13.10

Note:  All Honors College students must take four honors classes (in addition to the MHC seminars) in their four years at Hunter College.

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Jablonka

Section 01    W 3:10-5:40                           
Code #    4799        HN 521   

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Graff

Section 02    W 2:10-4:40                   
Code #    4800        HN 406                       

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Glick   

Section 03    W 10:10-12:40                   
Code #    4801        HW 205       

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Weinroth

Section 04    W 2:10-4:40                           
Code #    4802        HW 113

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC    Prof. Lesser

Section 05    W 2:10-4:40               
Code #    4803        HW 405       

MHC 100    MHC Seminar 1: Arts in NYC  Prof. Meyers-Kingsley   

Section 06    T 10:10-12:40                   
Code #4804        HN 1516   

MHC 200    MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology    Prof. Elston

Section 01    T, F 9:45-11:00                    
Code #4805        HW 207

MHC 200    MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology    Prof. Ronald

Section 02    W 10:10-1:00                   
Code #    4806        HW 610   

MHC 200     MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology    Prof. Marcotullio

Section 03    T, F 9:45-11:00                           
Code #    4807        HN C110       

MHC 200     MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology      Prof. Marcotullio

Section 04    T, F 2:10-3:25                               
Code #    4808        HW 611

MHC 200     MHC Seminar III: Science & Technology      Prof. Alexandratos

Section 05    M, TH 1:10-2:25                           
Code #    4809            HW 610   

ANTHC 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology    Prof. Friedlander

Section 900    Lecture W 12:10-1:00         HN Assembly Hall       
Code#0107    Lecture TH 12:10-1:00        HN Assembly Hall
Recitation M 12:10-1:00           HN 730

Note:  Fulfills GER Stage 2(B) and P & D (A)

ANTHC 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology    Prof. Friedlander

Section 901    Lecture W 12:10-1:00         HN Assembly Hall   
Code#0108    Lecture TH 12:10-1:00        HN Assembly Hall
Recitation M 12:10-1:00          HN 730

Note:  Fulfills GER Stage 2(B) and P & D (A)

BIOL 100    Principles of Biology I

Note:  This is not an Honors College class; you will not receive credit for an Honors College class.  These sections, however, are reserved for Honors College students:

Section 001    Recitation: M        08:00-08:50 HN C114
Lab              M     09:00-12:00 HN 812    
Lecture       TU     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
                   TH     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
    CODE#0324

Section 006    Recitation: W        08:00-08:50 HN C114
Lab            W     09:00-12:00 HN 815    
Lecture       TU     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
                 TH     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
    CODE#0329

Section 007    Recitation: TH    08:00-08:50 HN C114
Lab            TH     09:00-12:00 HN 812    
Lecture       TU     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
                TH     17:35-18:50 HN ASSEM
    CODE#0330

Please see your advisor if you want to register for one of these sections.

CHM 102        General Chemistry--Lecture            TBA

Section 900        T, F 9:10-11:00     HN Assembly Hall
Code#5275

Note:  This section is part of the regular Chemistry 102 lecture; it does not count as an Honors College class.  This code simply guarantees spaces for Honors College students.  And again please note:  this is only the lecture, not the recitation or lab.

CHM 102        General Chemistry--Lecture            TBA

Section 901        T, F 9:10-11:00     HN Assembly Hall
Code#5276

Note:  This section is part of the regular Chemistry 102 lecture; it does not count as an Honors College class.  This code simply guarantees spaces for Honors College students.  And again please note:  this is only the lecture, not the recitation or lab.

CHM 102        General Chemistry--Recitation        TBA

Section 900        W 12:10-1:00     HN 1403
Code#5277

Note:  This recitation section is reserved for Honors College students.  It does not count as an Honors College class.  And again please note:  this is only the recitation, not the lecture or lab.

CHM 102        General Chemistry--Recitation        TBA

Section 901        W 12:10-1:00     HN 1403
Code#5278

Note:  This recitation section is reserved for Honors College students.  It does not count as an Honors College class.  And again please note:  this is only the recitation, not the lecture or lab.

CHM 111        Chemical Principles                TBA

Section 900        T, W, F 9:10-11:00 (lecture and recitation) HW 511
Code#0604        F 12:10-4:00 (lab) HN 1412S

Note:  This course is 5.5 credits.

ENG 120     Expository Writing                Prof. Hayden

Section 900     T, F 12:45-2:00        3 credits
Code#1051            HN C112    

ENG 120     Expository Writing                Prof. Robbins

Section 901     T, F 11:10-12:25        3 credits
Code#1052            HN C112

ENG 220     Introduction to Literature            Prof. Brown

Section 900     T, TH 4:10-5:25        3 credits       
Code#1094            HN C110   

ENG 385.67    Wordsworth and Coleridge: The Poetry of Friendship 
Prof. Lattin

Section 900        M 3:10-5:40
Code#4742            HN C111       

ENG 390.71     Human Rights and Literature        Prof. Israel

Section 900         T, F 3:45-5:00               
Code#5061            HW 207   
 Note:      Prerequisite:  English 220; Fulfills GER Stage 3(A)  

 

This seminar explores the history of human rights discourse, with a special focus on how twentieth century literature and critical theory both support and challenge that discourse. The course weaves together critical strands currently preoccupying twentieth century studies: transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, Cold War politics, transitional justice, post-colonial studies and globalization. It should be of particular interest to those students interested in exploring questions of law and ethics. Questions we will consider include: How do we define “human rights,” and what do those rights have to do with global literary production? How do we negotiate between the subject who bears rights and the literary subject? How are human rights and literary narratives (or non-narratives) related? How can the logic of human rights account for imperialism and colonialism, and material disparities? Where is the “difference” in human rights rhetoric?

Requirements include 2000 word midterm paper, 4000 word research paper, and oral presentation.

ENG 390.85    Literature and Film            Prof. Lattin

Section 900        TH 1:10-3:40       
Code# 1239            HN C111

This course focuses on the presentation, interpretation and adaptation of literature into film.  Students will study six works of literature (Shakespeare’s Henry V, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Morrison’s Beloved, James’ The Turn of the Screw, Austen’s Emma, and Shelley’s Frankenstein).  Each student will be responsible for the reading of the literary works and the viewing of nine films (Whale’s “Frankenstein,” Condon’s “Gods and Monsters,” both Olivier’s and Branagh’s “Henry V,” McGrath’s “Emma,” Silverstone’s “Clueless,” Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now,” Bolt’s “The Turn of the Screw,” and Demme’s “Beloved”).  Class discussion will be an important part of the course.

HIST 151        U.S. from the Colonial Era to the Civil War     Prof. McCauley

Section 900         T/TH 4:10-5:25           
Code#1530         HW 509B

HIST 341.52                 Significant Themes in American Cultural History
Prof. Haverty-Stacke

Section 900        T/F 11:10-12:25
Code #5034        HW 1543

 Note:  Fulfills GER Stage 3(B)

In this course we will explore several significant themes in American cultural history from the late-nineteenth through the late-twentieth centuries.  Through close readings of selected primary and secondary works (both written and visual) we will consider the meanings of popular, proto-mass, and mass culture as well as the nature of different levels of cultural tastes and styles in modern American history.  Reflecting on the broader social and political context of these developments we will study a range of topics.  These may include, but will not be limited to, a consideration of the historical significance of the myth of the self-made man evoked in Horatio Alger novels, the role of the frontier and the cowboy popularized in Owen Wister's The Virginian, the resonance of early Disney films, such as The Three Little Pigs, during the Great Depression, and the critique of mass consumer culture found in the poetry of Allen Ginsberg.

HIST 384.65    The Dryfus Affair:  French Anti-Semitism Before the Holocaust         Prof. Schor

Section 900        T/F 3:45-5:00
Code#5028        HW 1543

HUM 250.61    First Amendment Law               Prof. Cohen

Section 900        M 3:00-5:30   
Code #5200        Roosevelt House 304

ITAL 260        The Modern Italian Short Story      Prof. Paynter

Section 900        M/TH 11:10-12:25        3 cr   
Code#1660        HW 509C

NOTE:  This course is conducted in English, and fulfills GER 2/C and P& D (D).  Prerequisite:  English 120 or the equivalent.

ITAL 361.70    Constructing Madness in its Multiple Perspectives   Prof. Calabritto

Section 900        T/TH 4:10-5:25               
Code#4997        HW 1344
 Note:  Fulfills GER Stage 3(A).

MATH 454        Calculus on Manifolds            Prof. TBA

Section 001        Mon 7:35-9:25 pm and 1 hour TBA
Code#4755        HE 920

This course covers functions on Euclidean space, implicit functions theorem, Fubinin's theorem, and integrations on chains and manifolds.  The course is for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Note:  Although this course is not solely for the Honors College, the Math Department is reserving five seats for our students.  The course will also count as an Honors College course.

MEDP 292        Basic Reporting                Prof. Stein

Section 001        M 10:10-1:00      470 HN
Code #1942

Note:  Although this course is not solely for the Honors College, the Media Department is reserving 8 seats for our students.  The course will not count as an Honors College course.  You should speak with your academic advisor to register.

MUSHL 101    Introduction to Music            Prof. Coppola

Section 900        M, TH 9:45-11:00           
Code#2000        HN 405

PHIL 204      Great Philosophers:  Modern and Contemporary   
Prof. Keating

Section 900        T, F 11:10-12:25
Code#2200        HW 509B   

POLSC 110 (W) American Government            Prof. Newton

Section 900        M, Th 11:10-12:00 (lecture)     HW 714   
Code#2333        Th 12:10-1:00 (discussion)      HW 1731

        GER 1C or GER 2B
        Not open to students who have taken POLSC 111
        Pre- or Corequisite:  English 120

POLSC 201      Ancient to Early Modern Political Thought   Prof. Wallach

Section 900        T/F 3:45-5:00
Code#4542        HW 1731

POLSC 202        Modern Political Thought           Prof. Marasco

Section 900        T/F 9:45-11:00Code#4543        HW 1731

 

POLSC 270    International Relations:  Conceptual Foundations and Current Events              Prof. Roberts

Section 900        M, Th 1:10-2:00 (lecture)     HN C002   
Code#4574        Th 2:10-3:00 (discussion)      HW 1731

Note:  This is a core course for those students interested in concentrating in International Relations in Political Science.  It is also a prerequisite for most 300-level International Relations courses.

POLSC 275        Politics of the Global Economy    Prof. Holt-Dwyer

Section 900        T/F 12:45-2:00
Code#5258        HW 1731

Highlighting the interaction of politics and economics across national borders, this course examines the theories, methods and substantive issues in the international political economy subfield, including the politics of trade, development, varieties of capitalism, globalization, and global commons issues.

Note:  Not open to students who have taken POLSC 376.  Fulfills GER 3(B).

POLSC 304.01    Marx and Marxism               Prof. Marasco

Section 900        T/F 11:10-12:25
Code#4565        HW 1731

This course provides an intensive survey of Marx’s writings and the
theoretical work that travels under his name.  Neither a comprehensive study
of  Marxist scholarship across the disciplines nor a history of Marxist thought
and practice, this course offers a focused tour of Marx and Marxist theory.
Given the geographical, historical and disciplinary range of what goes by the
name of Marxism, our tour cannot cover everything, nor can it to justice to
the richness of the subject matter in just thirteen weeks.  Instead, this
course aims to give students a working grasp of Marx’s most significant
ideas, concepts, and arguments, as well as the capacity to test these ideas,
use these concepts, and evaluate these arguments for contemporary political
thinking.     

Naturally, we will devote much of our energy to a systematic study of Marx™s own writings, from his early philosophical engagement with German Idealism to his mature analysis of capitalism.  Before we begin with our reading of Marx, we will start the semester with a look at some of his philosophical influences and touchstones, specifically G.W.F. Hegel and Ludwig Feuerbach.  We will turn then to questions and writings pertaining to Marxist method, the theory of politics and the state, the philosophy of history, and the critique of political economy.  Along with Marx, we will engage a number of twentieth-century Marxist theorists, including Raymond Williams, Georg Lukács, Louis Althusser, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and others. We will conclude the semester with oral presentations, in which small groups of students will prepare and present book reports for the rest of the class. 

POLSC 304.66    Power                       Prof. Feldman

Section 900        M 5:35-8:15
Code#4564        Roosevelt House 204

This seminar will be devoted to exploring rival theoretical formulations of the concept of power. What is power, and who has power? We will examine issues such as the balance between popular power and institutionalized power, the relationship between the state and economic power, ideological power and the question of “false consciousness” and social science debates concerning the multiple dimensions of power.

Texts are likely to include:  Robert Dahl, Who Governs?  Steven Lukes, Power: A Radical View;  Hannah Arendt, On Violence;  James Scott, Domination and the Arts of Resistance;  John Gaventa, Power and Powerlessness; Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish.

PSYCH 100       Introduction to Psychology            TBD

Section 900        M, TH 2:45-4:00                                                              Code#2435        HW 412

PSYCH 390.48    Biology of Decision Making        Prof.  Preuss

Section 900        TH 5:35-7:25
Code#5141        HW 117

Note:  This is a masters-level class that is cross-listed with the Macaulay Honors College.  The class has the following prerequisites:  ENGL 120, PSYCH 248, PSYCH 249 OR 250, PSYCH 180 OR EQUIVALENT, AND DECLARED PSYCH MAJOR

SPAN 264    Contemporary Spanish Literature in Translation   Prof. Hernandez-Ojeda.

Section 900        T, F 3:45 - 5:00 PM
Code #2790        HW 707C   

 Note:  Fulfills P & D (D)   

STAT 213    Introduction to Applied Statistics        TBD

Section 900         T, F 8:10-9:25                      
Code#2869             HW 413

WGS 100     Introduction to Women’s Studies        Prof. Hymson

Section 900    M, W 5:35-6:50
Code#2983    HW 405