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H. Jonathan Rendina

PhD, CUNY Graduate Center

MPH, Hunter College, CUNY

Department of Psychology

Hunter College

695 Park Avenue Rom N611

New York, NY 10065

Email: hrendina@hunter.cuny.edu

Current Research Interests

My research is broadly focused on the impact of social stress on health, and I am currently pursuing research looking at how HIV-related stressors influences the mental, behavioral, and physical health of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men. This work is informed by the minority stress model and seeks to integrate HIV-related and sexual minority stressors into a unified model of health for this population. Much of my research uses online and mobile technologies, particularly intensive longitudinal designs such as ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and my long-term goal is to develop and test mobile health (i.e., mHealth) interventions aimed at reducing the impact of social stress on health. I am also interested in the role of emotions as mediators and moderators of the stress-health association, with a particular emphasis on how emotional processing and its interaction with cognitive processing might help to explain why and for whom there is a strong tie between social stress and health. In addition to this primary line of research, I am also actively involved in several others lines of research, including: (1) developing event-level models of sexual decision making that integrate both cognitive and affective processes; (2) predictors, consequences, and patterns of substance use and abuse; and (3) HIV prevention, particularly pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and modeling trends over time in PrEP acceptability, uptake, and suspension. I maintain a particularly heavy emphasis on research methods and statistics, and regularly utilize methods such as multilevel modeling (MLM), factor analysis, structural equation modeling (SEM), psychometric analysis, and latent class analysis (LCA).

 

I conduct my research at Hunter’s Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training (CHEST), where I am a Faculty Investigator and the Director of Quantitative Methods. For more information about CHEST, please visit www.chestnyc.org.

Student Opportunities

Undergraduate and master’s students interested in gaining research experience and/or developing a topic for a thesis should visit the CHEST internship website (http://www.chestnyc.org/about-internships.html) where there is more information about the opportunities at CHEST (including registering with me for Psych 201, 395, and 396/398). Those interested in pursuing a PhD in Psychology at The CUNY Graduate Center and existing CUNY doctoral students interested in pursuing research experiences or having me serve as a member on exam/dissertation committees should contact me directly by email.

Selected Publications (For a full and up-to-date list, please see my Google Scholar and NCBI profiles)                   

Rendina, H. J., Gamarel, K. E., Pachankis, J. E., Ventuneac, A., Grov, C., & Parsons, J. T. (2016). Extending the minority stress model to incorporate HIV-positive gay and bisexual men’s experiences:  A longitudinal examination of mental health and sexual risk behavior. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s12160-016-9822-8. PubMed PMID: 27502073.

Wang, K., Rendina, H. J., & Pachankis, J. E. (2016). Looking on the bright side of stigma: How stress-related growth facilitates adaptive coping among sexual minorities. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/19359705.2016.1175396.

Eldahan, A. I., Pachankis, J. E., Rendina, H. J., Ventuneac, A., Grov, C., & Parsons, J. T. (2016). Daily minority stress and affect among gay and bisexual men: A 30-day diary study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 190, 828-835. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2015.10.066. PubMed PMID: 26625095. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4684999.

Rendina, H. J., Ventuneac, A., Mustanski, B., Grov, C., & Parsons, J. T. (2016). Prospective measurement of daily health behaviors: Modeling temporal patterns in missing data, sexual behavior, and substance use in an online daily diary study of gay and bisexual men. AIDS and Behavior, 20, 1730-43. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1359-0. PubMed PMID: 26992392; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4945494.

Rendina, H. J. (2015). When parsimony is not enough: Considering dual processes and dual levels of influence in sexual decision making. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 44, 1937-47. doi:10.1007/s10508-015-0569-2. PubMed PMID: 26168978. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4560994.

Rendina, H. J., Moody, R., Grov, C., Ventuneac, A., & Parsons, J. T. (2015). Aggregate and event-level associations between substance use and sexual behavior among gay and bisexual men: Comparing retrospective and prospective data. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 154, 199-207. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.06.045. PubMed PMID: 26190557. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4536153.

Pachankis, J. E., Rendina, H. J., Restar, A., Ventuneac, A., Grov, C., & Parsons, J. T. (2015). A minority stress-emotion regulation model of sexual compulsivity among highly sexually active gay and bisexual men. Health Psychology, 34, 829-40. doi:10.1037/hea0000180. PubMed PMID: 25528179. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4476950.

Parsons, J. T., Rendina, H. J., Grov, C., Ventuneac, A., & Mustanski, B. (2015). Accuracy in predicting daily anal sex and its relevance for event-based pre-exposure prophylaxis: A diary study of highly sexually active gay and bisexual men. JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 68, 449-55. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000507. PubMed PMID: 2555959; PubMed Central PMCID: PMCID: PMC4334732

Starks, T. J., Rendina, H. J., Breslow, A. S., Parsons, J. T., & Golub, S. A. (2013). The psychological cost of anticipating HIV stigma for HIV-negative gay and bisexual men. AIDS and Behavior, 17, 2732-2741. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0425-0. PubMed PMID: 23420102.

Rendina, H. J., Golub, S. A., Grov, C., Parsons, J. T. (2012). Stigma and sexual compulsivity in a community-based sample of HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual men. AIDS and Behavior, 16, 741-750. doi: 10.1007/s10461-011-0048-2. PubMed PMID: 21964977.