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COCO 700: Life Span Development

HUNTER COLLEGE, CUNY
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS
COCO 700 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT

 

COURSE  DESCRIPTION:
A biopsychosocial approach to development across the lifespan with particular attention to application of developmental theory to counseling is the focus of this course.

PRE-REQUISITES:
None.

STUDENT PRIVACY STATEMENT:
At times, students may disclose personal information through class discussions.  It is expected that the class will respect the privacy of their classmates.  The information disclosed in the class will not be repeated or discussed with other students outside of the course.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Goals
•    To gain understanding of developmental theories
•    To provide opportunities to experience applications of developmental theories to counseling situations
•    To promote understanding of obstacles to healthy human development

Objectives
•    Students will be able to identify basic tenets of relevant developmental theories
•    Students will be able to apply developmental theories to counseling case studies at all levels of development, specifically, they will be able to conceptualize clients using appropriate developmental theories
•    Students will be able to define and identify prevention and treatment interventions appropriate to various developmental levels
•    Students will reflect upon their own developmental experiences and apply developmental theories to their own life experiences
•    Students will understand how culture and gender impact development


METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
Lecture, small group discussion, small group projects, student presentations, and activities that promote self-reflection and awareness are the methods of instruction used in this course.


REQUIRED TEXT:
Juntunen, C.L. & Atkinson, D. R. (2003).  Counseling across the lifespan: Prevention and treatment.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Additional Articles may be assigned.

RECOMMENDED READINGS:
Howell, L. C. (2005) Counseling Middle-Aged Women as They Adapt to Important Changes in Their Lives.  VISTAS: Compelling Perspectives in Counseling, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Howell, L.C. & Beth, A. (2002).  Midlife Myths and Realities: Women Reflect on Their Experiences.  Journal of Women and Aging, 14(3/4), p. 189-204.

Charlifue, S. (2004).  Special issues:  Community integration following SCI, NeuroRehabilitation, 19 (2), pp. 91-101.

DeVivo, M.J. (2004).  Aging with a neurodisability:  Morbidity and life expectancy issues.  NeuroRehabilitation, 19 (1), pp. 1-2. 

   

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
•        Attendance.  It is important to attend class. More than two unexcused absences may result in your grade being lowered, you could be asked to repeat the course, or could fail the course.  These penalties are at the discretion of the professor.
•        Timely completion of all written assignments.  
5 points will be deducted for every late assignment.  No assignment will be accepted if it is more than one week past due. Assignments that do not appear on the syllabus may be assigned during a class session.
•        Timely completion of all Blackboard quizzes.
•        Questions for reflection. 
I expect that you will write thoughtful responses to these questions, and that you will apply the theories we have studied when appropriate.  Use Standard English, proper grammar and spelling.  All responses must be typed and doubled spaced.
•        Participation. 
Appropriate, thoughtful, and meaningful contributions to class discussions are an important part of learning.  Come to class prepared, having read and digested all reading assignments.  Some of you are reluctant to contribute to class discussions.  This is unacceptable.  If you have a problem speaking in front of your peers, then this is an opportunity for you to learn new behavior. Lack of meaningful participation will result in a lower grade.
•        Blackboard. 
Students must learn to access Blackboard, a computer program on which  various types of information as well as quizzes are posted.  Students who are unfamiliar with this tool may attend an orientation to Blackboard.  Check the computer center for times and dates.

Evaluation (Evaluation will be ongoing.)
•        Questions for Reflection will be answered throughout the semester.  Total 100 points.
•        Quizzes: Three objective quizzes ( multiple choice, true-false) will be posted on Blackboard.  (10 points each, 30 points total).
•        Final examination.  The final exam will be in the form of a case conceptualization.  Students will be asked to apply developmental theories to one of several fictitious cases.  Students should be able to identify stressors and supports, appropriately apply developmental theory to explain current behavior and predict future behavior, and identify any additional information they would like to have and provide a rationale for the need to know that information that is based on developmental theory.   50 points.
•        Attendance and participation: 20 points.
•        Grades will be assigned using the plus/minus system currently in place in the HC graduate schools, see the graduate catalog for values.  To compute your percentage grade simply divide the number of points you have earned by the total number of assignment points.



   
COURSE CONTENT

WEEK TOPIC  ASSIGNMENTs
CACREP STANDARDS
 1 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CHAPTERS 1,2 J/A
K 3: a, b,c,d, 8:e
 2 INTRO CONT. & introduction to case conceptualization

Questions for reflection due K 2: a, b, d, e, 3: a, b,c,d, 5: c,8:e
 3 CHILDHOOD 3,4,5 J/A
Questions for reflection due
K 3: a,b,c
 4 COMPLETE QUIZ 1 BY THIS DATE

 5 CASE CONCEPTUALIZATION in class; ADOLESCENCE.
Questions for reflection due
 6/7 J/A
K2: a,b,d,e; 3: a,b,c, 5:c, 8: e
 6 ADOLESCENCE. 8,9,10 J/A K 3 a,b,c
 7 ADOLESCENCE.
CASE CONCEPTUALIZATION in class

K2: a,b,d,e; 3: a,b,c; 5:c, 8: e
 8 YOUNG ADULTHOOD
COMPLETE QUIZ 2 BY THIS DATE
11-13 J/A K 3 a,b,c
 9 YOUNG ADULTHOOD 14-15 J/A K 3 a,b,c; 8:e
 10 YOUNG ADULTHOOD Relationship Autobiograpy K 3 a,b,c
 11 MIDLIFE 16-17
Questions for reflection due
K 3 a,b,c; 8: e
 12 LATE ADULTHOOD

COMPLETE QUIZ 3 BY THIS DATE
18-20
Questions for reflection due
K 3 a,b,c; 8: e
 13 CASE CONCEPTUALIZATION in class
K2: a,b,d,e; 5:c
 14 Review

 15 Final Exam

 


              
Expectations for Written Proficiency
Students must demonstrate consistently satisfactory written English in coursework. The Hunter College Writing Center provides tutoring to students across the curriculum and at all academic levels. For more information, see http://wwc.hunter.cuny.edu. In addition, the Teacher Placement Office in the School of Education offers a writing workshop during the semester and a series of free writing classes are offered to students who are in need of additional support in improving their writing skills. In both cases, stop by room I000 West for information and dates of workshops.

Integrity and Plagiarism
Hunter College has subscribed to the online company, Turnitin.comTurnitin.com allows faculty to compare student papers with extensive databases of billions of documents in order to detect and verify material that has been plagiarized.  In this course, Turnitin.com is used to deter students from plagiarizing material.  Please be aware that student papers will be examined from time to time.  Students who plagiarize will be punished. “Hunter College regards acts of academic dishonesty (e.g., plagiarism, cheating on examinations, obtaining unfair advantage, and falsification of records and official documents) as serious offenses against the values of intellectual honesty.  The college is committed to enforcing the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and will pursue cases of academic dishonesty according to the Hunter College Academic Integrity Procedures.”

Statement of Reasonable Accomodation
In compliance with the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Hunter College is committed to ensuring educational parity and accommodations for all students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. It is recommended that all students with documented disabilities (Emotional, Medical, Physical and/ or Learning) consult the Office of AccessABILITY located in Room E1124 to secure necessary academic accommodations.  For further information and assistance please call (212- 772- 4857)/TTY (212- 650- 3230).


CACREP STANDARDS MET BY THIS COURSE   

K.2.a. multicultural and pluralistic trends, including characteristics and concerns between and within diverse groups nationally and internationally;

K.2.b. attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences, including specific experiential learning activities;

K.2.d. counselors' roles in social justice, advocacy and conflict resolution, cultural self¬awareness, the nature of biases, prejudices, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit, mind, or body;

K.2.e. theories of multicultural counseling, theories of identity development, and multicultural competencies;

K.3.a. theories of individual and family development and transitions across the life span;

K.3.b. theories of learning and personality development;

K.3.c. human behavior, including an understanding of developmental crises, disability, exceptional behavior, addictive behavior, psychopathology, and situational and environmental factors that affect both normal and abnormal behavior;

K.3.d. strategies for facilitating optimum development over the life span;

K.5.c. counseling theories that provide the student with a consistent model(s) to conceptualize client presentation and select appropriate counseling interventions. Student experiences should include an examination of the historical development of counseling theories, an exploration of affective, behavioral, and cognitive theories, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case studies. Students will also be exposed to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice in the field so that they can begin to develop a personal model of counseling;

K.8.e. use of research to improve counseling effectiveness

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