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COCO 719: Individual Supervision

HUNTER COLLEGE, CUNY

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS

COCO 719 INDIVIDUAL SUPERVISION



COURSE  DESCRIPTION:
This course is taken in conjunction with Practicum in Counseling (COCO 718). Students present audiotapes of client sessions to acquire proficiency, gain confidence, enhance self-awareness and expand their understanding of the counseling relationship.  This experience allows the student to apply theoretical knowledge and approaches to intervention and assess his/her professional strengths and weaknesses.  Under the supervision of an experienced and qualified counselor, students receive in-depth training in developing the client/counselor relationship, service coordination,  assessment, career planning and development, community resources, referral procedures, follow-up and advocacy.

PRE-REQUISITES:
Prerequisites for all Counseling Students: COCO 701, 702
Prerequisites for School Counseling Students: COCO 700 & COUNS 717
Corequsite for all Counseling Students: COCO 718

STUDENT PRIVACY STATEMENT
At times, students may disclose personal information through class discussions.  It is expected that the class will respect the privacy of their classmates.  The information disclosed in the class will not be repeated or discussed with other students outside of the course.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The counselor-student will be more knowledgeable about: a. the counseling relationship, b. theories of counseling, c. different approaches to intervention, d. the role of clinical supervision in the field of counseling, e. the role of the counselor in a school, agency, hospital, or other professional setting, f. service coordination in the field of counseling, g. methods of vocational assessment, career planning and job development, h. community resources, i. Follow-up and support services for consumers, j. termination of a counseling relationship.

The counselor-student will be able to: a. establish counseling relationships, b. apply theories of counseling and integrate counseling skills, c. prepare for effective supervision, d. describe the role of a professional counselor, e. coordinate client services, f. develop and implement vocational assessments, career planning and job development; g. appropriately utilize community resources, h. provide follow-up service, i. effectively terminate a counseling relationship.

The counselor-student will participate in an ongoing reflective process to ensure that theoretical knowledge and counseling skills are implemented to promote best practice.  The counselor-student will demonstrate the ability to self-reflect and examine reactions and feelings related to counseling and supervision experiences.

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
Students meet individually for one hour of weekly supervision with a college faculty member.  Students present audiotapes of client sessions for review and critique.

REQUIRED TEXT:
NONE

RECOMMENDED READINGS:
Kiser, P.M. (2008). The human services internship: Getting the most from your experience. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
A minimum five audiotapes of counseling sessions are presented and reviewed.  Students are also required to complete a written midterm examination, which consists of a Case Presentation of 5-8 pages.  To document student activity in the field placement, students are required to complete weekly journal entries to include:  relationship with site-supervisor; issues regarding particular clients; organizational issues at the practicum site; relationships with other staff: the student’s own development as a counselor; training experiences had at the practicum site.  To gain practice in self-evaluation, students identify two to four learning goals.  These goals are documented, reviewed and modified once a month.  

EVALUATION/GRADE ASSIGNMENT

Grading Evaluation
%
Weekly Journals:  25%
Case Presentation:  25%
Counseling Tapes:
 35%
Learning Contracts:  15%
----------------------------- ----

 100%

 

%

Grade
100-97.5% = A+
92.5– 97.4% = A
90 – 92.4% = A-
87.5 – 89.9%
=
B+
82.5 – 87.4% = B
80.0 – 82.4%
=
B-
77.5 – 79.9%
=
C+
70.0 – 77.4% = C
0 – 69.9% = F


   
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR COUNSELING SKILLS AND INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES

WEEK TOPIC CACREP STANDARDS
Week 1 Introduction to the course: purpose and goals; explanation of assignments; scheduling;  Learning Contract. Each month, the supervisor and student will review the contract to set 2-4 goals to be achieved by the student. 
5a-d & g
Week 2; 3; 4
Presentation of taped counseling sessions. Student presents relevant counseling issues and concerns pertaining to the individuals with whom they are working.  Topics may include, but are not limited to: the application of theory to practice; self-awareness; multicultural counseling issues; gender, age, disability issues; sexual orientation;  career development; ethical/legal issues.
2a-f
5a-d & g
Week 5 Review and revise Learning Contract.  Establish new goals for the next 4 weeks. 2a-f
5a-d & g
Week 6 Review case presentation 2a-f
5a-d & g
Week 7; 8; 9
Presentation of taped counseling sessions. Student presents relevant counseling issues and concerns pertaining to the individuals with whom they are working.  Topics may include, but are not limited to: the application of theory to practice; self-awareness; multicultural counseling issues; gender, age, disability issues; sexual orientation; career development; ethical/legal issues. 2a-f
5a-d & g
Week 10 Review and revise supervision contract. Introduce the process of “termination”. 2a-f
5a-d & g
Week 11; 12; 13
Presentation of taped counseling session. Student presents relevant counseling issues and concerns pertaining to the individuals with whom they are working.  Topics may include, but are not limited to: the application of theory to practice; self-awareness; multicultural counseling issues; gender, age, disability issues; sexual orientation; career development; ethical/legal issues. 2a-f
5a-d & g
Week 15 Final meeting to discuss the practicum and supervision experience: what was accomplished; plans and goals for the internship. 2a-f
5a-d & g

Expectations for Written Proficiency
Students must demonstrate consistently satisfactory written English in coursework. The Hunter College Writing Center provides tutoring to students across the curriculum and at all academic levels. For more information, see http://wwc.hunter.cuny.edu. In addition, the Teacher Placement Office in the School of Education offers a writing workshop during the semester and a series of free writing classes are offered to students who are in need of additional support in improving their writing skills. In both cases, stop by room I000 West for information and dates of workshops.

Integrity and Plagiarism
Hunter College has subscribed to the online company, Turnitin.comTurnitin.com allows faculty to compare student papers with extensive databases of billions of documents in order to detect and verify material that has been plagiarized.  In this course, Turnitin.com is used to deter students from plagiarizing material.  Please be aware that student papers will be examined from time to time.  Students who plagiarize will be punished. “Hunter College regards acts of academic dishonesty (e.g., plagiarism, cheating on examinations, obtaining unfair advantage, and falsification of records and official documents) as serious offenses against the values of intellectual honesty.  The college is committed to enforcing the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and will pursue cases of academic dishonesty according to the Hunter College Academic Integrity Procedures.”

Statement of Reasonable Accomodation
In compliance with the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Hunter College is committed to ensuring educational parity and accommodations for all students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. It is recommended that all students with documented disabilities (Emotional, Medical, Physical and/ or Learning) consult the Office of AccessABILITY located in Room E1124 to secure necessary academic accommodations.  For further information and assistance please call (212- 772- 4857)/TTY (212- 650- 3230).


CACREP STANDARDS MET BY THIS COURSE   

K2.a. multicultural and pluralistic trends, including characteristics and concerns between and within diverse groups nationally and internationally;

K2.b. attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences, including specific experiential learning activities;

K2.c. individual, couple, family, group, and community strategies for working with  diverse populations and ethnic groups;

K5.a. counselor and consultant characteristics and behaviors that influence helping processes including age, gender, and ethnic differences, verbal and nonverbal behaviors and personal characteristics, orientations, and skills;

K5.b. an understanding of essential interviewing and counseling skills so that the student is able to develop a therapeutic relationship, establish appropriate counseling goals, design intervention strategies, evaluate client outcome, and successfully terminate the counselor-client relationship. Studies will also facilitate student self-awareness so that the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and the counselor maintains appropriate professional boundaries;

K5.c. counseling theories that provide the student with a consistent model(s) to  conceptualize client presentation and select appropriate counseling interventions. Student experiences should include an examination of the historical development of counseling theories, an exploration of affective, behavioral, and cognitive theories, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case studies. Students will also be exposed to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice in the field so that they can begin to develop a personal model of counseling;

K5.d. a systems perspective that provides an understanding of family and other systems  theories and major models of family and related interventions. Students will be exposed to a rationale for selecting family and other systems theories as appropriate modalities for family assessment and counseling;

K5.g. ethical and legal considerations.

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