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COUNS 721: Counseling Interventions for Children and Adolescents

HUNTER COLLEGE, CUNY

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS

COUNS 721 Counseling Interventions for Children and Adolescents



COURSE  DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses on prevention and intervention of mental health disorders of children and adolescents.  It presents cognitive-behavioral and behavioral strategies for use when counseling children and adolescents. The course focuses on the importance of the relationship between the counselor and the client or consultee and the flexible use of a variety of evidence based interventions both individual and group, to address problems experienced by individuals in the urban context. 

PRE-REQUISITES:
DSM4 Workshop; COCO 700 Life Stage Development , COCO 702 Theories of Counseling, COCO 706 Group Counseling, COCO 718 Practicum in Counseling; COCO 708 Measurement and Appraisal,
CO-REQUISITES:  COCO 725, Internship 1

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
•    Students will be able to identify, develop, and implement four types of school counselor interventions including individual counseling, small group counseling, large group guidance, peer helping approaches.
•    Students will understand evidence based practice and utilize empirically based interventions appropriate for use with children and adolescents
•    Students will understand primary prevention, secondary prevention and tertiary prevention and appropriate strategies for each of these.
•    Students will develop an awareness of critical clinical issues, for example, depression, suicidality, neglect, abuse, and others, as well as the appropriate actions to take when these issues arise.
•    Students will develop an understanding of counseling related problems/issues confronting children and adolescents including addictive behavior, psychopathology, abuse, violence, situational and environmental factors that may impede academic, personal/social, or career success, and overall development.
•    Students will study the effectiveness and efficacy of techniques for prevention, early intervention, and crisis management.
•    Students will acquire the skills necessary to utilize various cognitive behavioral interventions with children and adolescents.
•    Students will understand the referral process and be able to identify appropriate referrals for children and adolescents.
•    Students will demonstrate an awareness of the professional and ethical codes of conduct in school counseling and an understanding of how the codes relate to you and your clients.

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
This course will be taught using a variety of methods including extensive readings, lecture, small group discussion, full class discussion, and small group activities.   Written assignments allow individuals an opportunity to apply the information conveyed in lectures and readings.

REQUIRED TEXT:

Textbooks

Erford, B. T. (2003).  Transforming the School Counseling Profession. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merril Prentice Hall.

Reinecke, M. A., Dattilio, F. M., & Freeman, A. (Eds.). (2003). Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (2nd ed.). NY: Guilford Press.

Pedersen, P. & Carey, J. C. (2003)  Multicultural Counseling In Schools:  A Practical Handbook.

Chapters from the following texts will be placed on reserve.
Evans, D.L., Foa, E.B., Gur, R. e., Hendin, H., O’Brien, C. P., Seligman, M. E. P., Walsh, B. T. (Eds.)  (2005).  Treating and Preventing Adolescent Mental Health Disorders: What we know and what we don’t know.  A research agenda for improving the mental health of our youth.  NY: Oxford University Press.  Selected chapters will be assigned from this book.  All of these chapters will be placed on reserve.  Specific chapters are listed in the attached “Tentative Schedule.”

P.E. Nathan & J.M. Gorman (Eds.),(2002) A guide to treatments that work (2nd ed.),  New York: Oxford University Press.  Selected chapters will be assigned from this book.  All of these chapters will be placed on reserve.  Specific chapters are listed in the attached “Tentative Schedule.”

Pedersen, P. & Carey, J.C. (1994)  Multicultural Counseling in Schools.  Selected chapters will be assigned from this book.  All of these chapters will be placed on reserve.  Specific chapters are listed in the attached “Tentative Schedule.”


RECOMMENDED READINGS:
Gysbers, N. & Henderson, P. (2000). Developing and Managing Your School Guidance program, 3rd Ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Dykeman, C. (1998). Maximizing School Guidance Program Effectiveness: A guide for school administrators and program directors. Greensboro, NC: ERIC/CASS Publications.

Campbell, C. & Dahir, C. (1997). Sharing the Vision: The National School Counseling Standards. Alexandria, VA: American School Counseling Association Press.

Dahir, C., Sheldon, C. & Valiga, M. (1998).Vision into Action: Implementing the National Standards. Alexandria, VA: American School Counseling Association Press.

   

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Attendance and Class Participation
It is important to attend class.  However, I know that at times health or professional reasons may interfere with class attendance.  If you must miss class for health or professional reasons, please let me know prior to the class that you must miss.  If you are ill, phone me.  If you know in advance that you must attend a professional activity, please notify me via a note that includes your name, the date you will miss class, and the reason for missing the class.  Please note, you are enrolled in a highly competitive professional program.  Missing class to attend the theater, to go on vacation, etc. are not acceptable reasons for missing class.  Each unexcused absence will result in your grade being lowered by one grade.  

Timely completion of all written assignments. 

All written assignments must be typed, and I expect that you will prepare your papers in APA Editorial format when appropriate.  Assignments are due at the beginning of class.  Please do not email your assignments. Grades will be lowered by a half grade for every late assignment.  No assignment will be accepted if it is more than one week past due. Assignments that do not appear on the syllabus may be assigned during a class session.

Learning Contract. 
What do you expect to gain from this course?  What are your specific goals and objectives for your learning in this course?  How do you plan to accomplish your goals?  How will you know that you have achieved your goals?  5% of final grade.
   
Midterm exam.
Constitutes 25% of the final grade*.  This exam will be a multiple choice exam.

Papers.
 
Three papers will be written–none should exceed 10 pages.  Each paper constitutes 15% of your total grade, for a total of 45% for all three papers.  Paper #1:  Each student will develop a group psychoeducation prevention program.  Students should identify an appropriate issue that can be addressed via a prevention program.  Review the literature to determine what interventions might be appropriate, that is, interventions that have empirical evidence to support their use, then develop a short term program.  Include the content of the program, the target population for the program.  Paper #2: Each student will develop a group psychoeducation program suitable for individuals who have been identified as at risk.  Students should identify a specific at risk group.  Review the literature to determine what interventions might be appropriate, that is, interventions that have empirical evidence to support their use, then develop a short program.  Paper #3: Identify a tertiary prevention problem/issue.  Review the literature to identify empirically supported interventions. Determine how one might diagnose the problem, then develop a plan for implementing an empirically supported intervention.

Final exam.
 
Constitutes 25% of the final grade.  This exam will be a multiple choice exam.*

GRADES
Grades will be calculated as follows:

Grading Evaluation
%
Learning contract   
 25%
Midterm Exam  25%
Written Assignments
 25%
Final Exam   
 25%
----------------------------- ----

 100%

 

%

Grade
100-97.5% = A+
92.5– 97.4% = A
90 – 92.4% = A-
87.5 – 89.9%
=
B+
82.5 – 87.4% = B
80.0 – 82.4%
=
B-
77.5 – 79.9%
=
C+
70.0 – 77.4% = C
0 – 69.9% = F


   
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR COUNSELING SKILLS AND INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES

WEEK TOPIC Reading Assignments/ Written Assignments
CACREP STANDARDS
Week 1
Introduction to course, Primary prevention, secondary prevention, tertiary intervention, individual, group, curriculum interventions;
Evidence-Based mental health treatments; recognizing youth mental disorders, Engaging the client & the Working Alliance
The application of interventions to diverse populations
Be sure that you read these assignment by next class session.
• Evans, D. L. & Seligman, M.E.P. Introduction.  pp xxv-xl, In Evans et al. (2005), Treating and preventing adolescent mental health disorders, NY: Oxford.;
• Hoagwood, K. The research, policy, and practice context for delivery of evidence-based mental health treatments for adolescents: A systems perspective pp. 546-560 In Evans et al. (2005), Treating and preventing adolescent mental health disorders, NY: Oxford
 
K.5.b
K.8.e
B7
 
Week 2 Goal Setting
Assessment, Early identification,   Empirically Supported Treatment Issues; does school counseling work?
 The following readings are due today:
• Goal Setting Chapter

• American Counseling Association.  Code of ethics and standards of practice, in Erford, pp. 455-481.

• American School Counseling Association.  Ethical standards for school counselors, in Erford, pp. 482-486. American Counseling Association

• Nathan, P.E., & Gorman, J.M. (2002).  Efficacy, effectiveness, and the clinical utility of psychotherapy research.  In P.E. Nathan & J.M. Gorman (Eds.), A guide to treatments that work (2nd ed., pp. 643-654).  New York: Oxford.

• Reinecke, M.A., Dattilio, F.M., & Freeman, A. (1996).  General issues.  In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (pp. 1-9).  New York: Guilford Press.

• Tryon, G.S. (1985).  The engagment quotient: One index of a basic counseling task.  Journal of college Student Personnel, 26, 351-354.

• Tryon, G.S. (1989).  Study of variables related to client engagement using practicum trainees and experienced clinicians.  Psychotherapy, 26, 54-61.

• Whiston, S. C. (2003) Outcomes research on school counseling services.  In Erford (2003) Transforming the School Counseling Profession.

• Wright, J.H., & Davis, D. (1994).  The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioral therapy: Patient perceptions and therapist responses.  Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 1, 24-45.

The following written assignments are due today: Learning Contract due

3C
5b
8e
Week 3 The positive perspective on youth development; Developmental classroom guidance; primary prevention approaches; Peer helping methods including peer counseling, tutoring, mediation.
The following readings are due today:
• Ripley (2003) Conflict resolution and peer mediation in schools, pp 297-315 In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession
• Goodnough, Perusse, & Erford (2003) Developmental classroom guidance pp121-151.In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession
• Niles & Akos (2003) Fostering Educational and Career planning in students pp. 153-170;In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession
• Romer, D. & McIntosh, M. (2005) The roles and perspectives of school mental health professionals in promoting adoelscent mental health, pp.597-615 in Evans et al. Treating and preventing adolescent mental health disorders.
• Commission on Positive Youth Development (2005). The positive persepctive in youth development, pp. 497-527, in Evans et al. Treating and preventing adolescent mental health disorders.
K: 3d
K: 6e
C-2,b,c
Week 4 School issues  The following readings are due today:
• Newsome & Gladding (2003), Counseling individuals & groups in school pp. 209-230 In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession.;
• Bradley-Klug & Shapiro (2003) Treatment of academic skills problems, pp 281-303. In  M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press.
• Fontes, L.A., (2003) Reducing violence in multicultural schools.  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
• McKenna, N., Roberts, J., & Woodfin, L. (2003) Working cross-culturally in family school partnerships .  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
• Juntunen, C.L., Atkinson, D.R.,  & Tierney, G. (2003).  School counselors and school psychologists as School-Home-Community.  Liaisons in Ethnically Diverse Schools.  .  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
• Leong, F.T.L. & Tan, V.L.M. (2003) Cross-cultural career counseling in schools.  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.

6e
Week 5 Working with various types of students The following readings are due today:
• Lockhart, E.J. Students with disabilities, pp 357-409. In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession.;
• Bemak, Chung, & Murphy.  A new perspective on counseling at risk youth pp285-296 In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession.
• Beebe, D.W. & Risi, S.  Treatment of adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism or Asperger Syndrome pp 369-401  In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press.
• Facundo, A, Nuttal, E. V.,  & Walton, J. (1994).  Culturally sensitive assessment in schools.  In Multicultural Counseling in Schools.  Allyn & Bacon.
• Boscardin,  M.L., Brrown-Chidsey, R., & Gonzalez-Martinez, J.C., (2003) Counseling approaches with students with disabilities from diverse backgrounds   In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
• Bemak, F. & Chung, R.C. (2003) Multicultural counseling with immigrant students in schools.  .  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
• Roysircar-Sodowsky & Frey, L.L. (2003)  Children of immigrants:  Their workviews value conflicts.  .  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
• Casas, J.M., Furlong, M.J., & de Esparza, C.R. (2003).  Increasing Hispanic parent participation in schools:  The role of the counselor.  .  In P.Pedersen & J. C. Carey  Multicultural Counseling In Schools.
Paper #1 due
C2a,b
Week 6 Approaches to counseling children The following readings are due today:
• Newsome (2003) Counseling interventions using expressive arts pp 231-247 In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession.;;
• Knell, S. M. & Ruma, C. D. Play therapy with a sexually abused child pp 338-368 In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press
C 2 d
Week 7 Midterm exam  
Week 8 Working with students with mental and emotional disorders;
chemically dependent adolescents
The following readings are due today:
• Kaffenberger & Seligman (2003) Helping students with mental and emotional disorders pp 249-283 In Erford, (2003) Transforming the school counseling profession. ;
• Patterson, & O”Connell (2003) Recovery maintenance and relapse prevention with chemically dependent adolescents In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press
C2
Week 9 ODD; Anger control issues The following readings are due today:
• Pardini & Lochman (2003) Treatments for oppositional defiant disorder.   In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (pp 43-69). New York: Guilford Press.
• Ecton, R. B., & Feindler, E.L. (1990).  Anger control training for temper control disorders.  In E. L. Feindler & G.R. Kalfus (Eds.), Adolesecent behavior therapy handbook (pp. 351-371).  New York: Springer.
C2d
Week 10 ADHD
The following readings are due today:
• Hinshaw,S. P., Klein, R. G., & Abikoff, H. B. (2002).  Childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Nonpharmocological treatments and their combination.  In P.E. Nathan & J. M. Gorman (eds.), A guide to treatments that work (2nd ed. pp. 3-23) New York: Oxford.
• Ervin, R. A., Bankert, C.L., & DuPaul, G.J. (1996).  Treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.  In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (pp. 38-61).  New York: Guilford Press.
• MTA Cooperative Group. (1999).  A 14-month randomized clinical trial of treatment strategies for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.  Archives of General Psychiatry, 56, 1073-1086.
• Anastopoulos, A.D. (1996).  Facilitating parental understanding and management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (pp.327-343). New York: Guilford Press

• Paper #2 due
C2d
Week 11 Depression
Youth suicide, intervention and prevention
The following readings are due today:
• Curry & Reinecke (2003) Modular Therapy for adolescents with major depression, pp. 95-127 In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice
• Defining Youth Suicide; Universal approaches to youth suicide prevention, Targeted youth suicide prevention programs; Preventive Interventions and treatments for suicidal youth, pp.434 -493 in Evans et al. Treating and preventing adolescent mental health disorders.
B7
C2d
Week 12 Self-esteem/ social anxiety disorder
The following readings are due today:
• Shirk, burwell, & Harter ( 2003) Strategies to modify low self-esteem in adolescents, pp189-213
• Albano, A. M. (2003) Treatment of social anxiety disorder, pp 128-161. In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press.
C2d
Week 13 Eating disorders
The following readings are due today:
• Bowers, W. A., Evans, K., LeGrange, D., Andersen, A.E. (2003) Treatment of adolescent eating disorders, pp. 247-280 ; In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press.
• Striegel-Moore, R.H. & Bulik, C.M. (2007). Risk factors for eating disorder. American Psychologist, 62 (3), pp 181-198.
• Wilson, G.T., Grilo, C.M., Vitousek, K.M. (2007). Psychologicla treatment of eating disorders. American Psychologist, 62(3), pp 199-216.

• Paper #3 due
C2d
Week 14 Sexual Abuse
The following readings are due today:
• Heflect, A, H. & Deblinger, E. (2003) Treatment of a sexually abused adolescent w/ith posttraumatic stress disorder, pp 214-246.  In M.A. Reinecke, F.M. Dattilio & A. Freeman (Eds.), Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice.  New York: Guilford Press.
C2d
Week 15 Final Exam


Expectations for Written Proficiency
Students must demonstrate consistently satisfactory written English in coursework. The Hunter College Writing Center provides tutoring to students across the curriculum and at all academic levels. For more information, see http://wwc.hunter.cuny.edu. In addition, the Teacher Placement Office in the School of Education offers a writing workshop during the semester and a series of free writing classes are offered to students who are in need of additional support in improving their writing skills. In both cases, stop by room I000 West for information and dates of workshops.

Integrity and Plagiarism
Hunter College has subscribed to the online company, Turnitin.comTurnitin.com allows faculty to compare student papers with extensive databases of billions of documents in order to detect and verify material that has been plagiarized.  In this course, Turnitin.com is used to deter students from plagiarizing material.  Please be aware that student papers will be examined from time to time.  Students who plagiarize will be punished. “Hunter College regards acts of academic dishonesty (e.g., plagiarism, cheating on examinations, obtaining unfair advantage, and falsification of records and official documents) as serious offenses against the values of intellectual honesty.  The college is committed to enforcing the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and will pursue cases of academic dishonesty according to the Hunter College Academic Integrity Procedures.”

Statement of Reasonable Accomodation
In compliance with the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Hunter College is committed to ensuring educational parity and accommodations for all students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. It is recommended that all students with documented disabilities (Emotional, Medical, Physical and/ or Learning) consult the Office of AccessABILITY located in Room E1124 to secure necessary academic accommodations.  For further information and assistance please call (212- 772- 4857)/TTY (212- 650- 3230).


CACREP STANDARDS MET BY THIS COURSE   

K.3.d. strategies for facilitating optimum development over the life span; and

K.5.b. an understanding of essential interviewing and counseling skills so that the student is able to develop a therapeutic relationship, establish appropriate counseling goals, design intervention strategies, evaluate client outcome, and successfully terminate the counselor-client relationship. Studies will also facilitate student self-awareness so that the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and the counselor maintains appropriate professional boundaries;

K.6.e. approaches used for other types of group work, including task groups, psychoeducational groups, and therapy groups;

K.8.e. use of research to improve counseling effectiveness;

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