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Jason Young


Dr. Jason Young, Ph.D., Social Psychology, University of Minnesota—Minneapolis, is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY), and is also on the graduate faculty of the Educational Psychology program at The Graduate Center (CUNY). Dr. Young teaches courses in research methods, attitudes and persuasion, social cognition, and evolutionary psychology, as well as graduate-level courses in applications of social psychology to social issues. His research focuses on the influence of emotions on various judgment and decision-making processes. For the past decade, he has explored the effect of media-driven fear on judgments about the prevalence, seriousness and perceived importance of various issues, particularly crime. In addition to conducting several laboratory experiments and surveys at Hunter College, he also collaborates with Prof. Derek Chadee, a behavioral scientist at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad, to explore the extent to which the effects of fear on issue perceptions show cross-cultural—and perhaps more universal—similarities. Since 2000, he has been conducting several controlled experiments which explore the impact of mood and arousal on judgments of HIV risk, involving both individual participants and dating heterosexual couples. Through this work, he has developed a model which suggests that the success of HIV interventions is partly contingent upon adequately addressing the effects of the positive emotions and sexual arousal that are present in the sexual situation in which the ultimate safer-sex decision is made. He has published several articles on fear of crime, evolutionary psychology, and, most recently, a chapter outlining his “On the Verge” model that describes the steps needed to make safer-sex interventions more effective. He has also presented and been invited to speak on these topics at both national and international conferences. Dr. Young has been a reviewer for several major social psychology journals in both basic and applied areas, including Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Personality Research, International Journal of Psychology, Journal of Social Distress and Homelessness, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Political Psychology, Social Psychology Quarterly.

Publications:

Chadee, R., & Young, J. (Eds.) (In Press). Current theories and applications of Social Psychology. St. Augustine, Trinidad: University of the West Indies Press.

Young, J. (In Press). “On the Verge”: A new paradigm for understanding decision-making about safer sex behavior. In D. Chadee and J. Young (Eds.), Current theories and applications of Social Psychology. St. Augustine, Trinidad: University of the West Indies Press.

Edinger, K.L., Young, J., Luine, V., & Frye, C. A. (2005). Northeast Under/graduate Research Organization for Neuroscience (NEURON): An update on our Ninth Annual Conference for Neuroscience Trainees and Educators. Journal of Behavioral and Neuroscience Research, 3, 1-6.

Ellis, P., & Young, J. (2004). Evolutionary thinking within Political Science: Addressing some feminist concerns. Journal of Women and Politics, 25, 31-53.

Young, J. (2003). The role of fear in agenda setting by television news. American Behavioral Scientist, 46, 1673-1695.

Young, J., & Persell, R. (2000). On the evolution of misunderstandings about evolutionary psychology. In. D. LeCroy & P. Moller (Eds.), Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 907): Evolutionary perspectives on human reproductive behavior (pp. 218-224). New York: New York Academy of Sciences.

Weadick, K., Osborne, R.E., Penticuff, J., Young, J., & Norman, J. (1998). Different I’s of different beholders: Self-monitoring and the categorization of self and others. Psi Chi Journal of Undergraduate Research, 3, 56-68.

Young, J., & DaPrada, T. (1998). Effects of presenting research at an undergraduate psychology convention. Eye on Psi Chi, 2, 23-26.

Young, J., Thomsen, C., Borgida, E., Sullivan, J., & Aldrich, K. (1998). Amikor az onerdek szamit: A konstruktum-hozzaferhetoseg szerepe a politikai gondolkodasban. In Gyorgy Hunyady (Ed.), Torteneti es politikai pszichologia. Budapest: Osiris Kiado, pp. 487-524. [Hungarian translation of Young et al, 1991].

Carroll, P., Young, J., & Guerten, M. (1992). Visual analysis of cartoons: A view from The Far Side. In K. Raynor (Ed.), Eye-movements and visual cognition: Scene perception and reading (pp. 444-461). New York: Springer-Verlag.

Young, J., Thomsen, C., Borgida, E., Sullivan, J., & Aldrich, J. (1991). When self-interest makes a difference: The role of construct accessibility in political reasoning. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 27, 271-296.

Young, J. (1989). In search of the silver lining. [Review of H-J. Hippler, N. Schwartz, & S. Sudman (Eds.), Social information processing and survey methodology.] Contemporary Psychology, 34, 130-131.

Young, J., Borgida, E., Sullivan, J., & Aldrich, J. (1987). Personal agendas and the relationship between self-interest and voting behavior. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50, 64-71.


Presentations:

Young, J., Thomasino, A.M., Salvatore, L., Desert, B., Ahmed, T., & Velez, P. (2006, May). How dating couples discuss safer sex: The impact of affect. Association for Psychological Science, New York, NY.

Young, J. (2006, April). Invited address. Next steps in HIV prevention: Toward a wiser consideration of the context in which safer sex decisions are made. University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Young, J. (2006, February). Invited address. Overestimations of abominations: Media and experiential influences on perceptions of the prevalence of crime. International Conference on Crime and Justice in the Caribbean, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

Rosas, J., & Young, J. (2005, November). The influence of violent rap lyrics on antisocial attitudes Rap Music. Greater New York Behavioral Research Conference, John Jay College, New York, NY.

Young, J., DiBerto, G., Johnson, J., and Velez, P. (2005, August). How mood and arousal affect assessment of risky sexual behavior. Division 8 (Social/Personality), American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Young, J. (2005, June). The pervasive effect of fear as a cue for perceived personal relevance: Evidence from news media and folk tales. Human Behavior and Evolution Society, Austin, TX.

Young, J. (2004, November). Invited address. Is Hunter passing the CUNY Proficiency Exam? Symposium sponsored by the Hunter Teaching Learning Center, Hunter College, NY.

Young, J. (2004, April). The influence of fear on news issue importance: A longitudinal study. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Young, J. (2004, February). Invited address. The effects of mood and arousal on safer-sex decision-making. Behavioral and Social Scientist Volunteer Program of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans.

Young, J. (2004, January). Implications of the fear-importance link: Evolutionary advantages and contemporary perceptual biases. Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, Texas.

Young, J. (2003, October). Invited address. The evolutionary significance of fear: A psychological signal that shapes our worldview. Social Psychology Doctoral Program Seminar, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

Rogers, M., Tien, C., Wood, M., & Young, J. (2003, May). Invited address. A snapshot of life in New York City: Presenting the results of the 2002 Hunter Poll. Presidential Roundtable at Hunter College, New York, NY.

Young, J. (2002, December). Invited address. Examining the impact of mood on the effectiveness of safer-sex advertisements. American Psychological Association/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-sponsored seminar for the Behavioral and Social Scientist Volunteer Program, New Orleans.

Young, J. (2002, November). Understanding how fear in the news shapes the public’s agenda. New York Chapter of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, New York, NY.

Young, J., & Ellis, P. (2001, October). Evolutionary my dear Watson: Deducing the implications of evolutionary psychology for international relations. Association for Politics and Life Sciences, Charleston, SC.

Ellis, P., & Young, J. (2001, October). Nominal (not ordinal) sex differences: Some implications of evolutionary theory for feminist politics. Association for Politics and Life Sciences, Charleston, SC.

Young, J. (1999, August). Invited address. Involving undergraduates in psychological research. Psi Chi: The Honors Society in Psychology, at the American Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

Young, J. (1997, July). Toward a psychological understanding of the agenda setting process in political campaigns. International Society of Political Psychology, Washington, D.C.

Harris, J., & Young, J. (1996, August). The influence of mood state on judgments about safer sex. American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Young, J. (1996, June). Fear and agenda setting: Emotion directs perceptions of issue importance. American Psychological Society, New York, NY.

Young, J. (1996, March). Invited address. The influence of fear on the agenda-setting process in newspapers. Political Science proseminar, Department of Political Science, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY.

Young, J. (1995, November). Invited address. The role of emotion in determining issue attitudes in political campaigns. Columbia University Seminar series on Political Psychology, New York, NY

Young, J., & Moore, V. (1993, May). The effects of gender and ethnicity on learned helplessness. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Osborne, R., & Young, J. (1992, August). The influence of personality on the organization of information about self and others. American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Young, J., & Carroll, P. (1991, August). Focusing on funniness: Integrative processing of cartoon drawings and captions. American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Young, J., & Osborne, R. (1990, July). Wimp vs. Shrimp: Individual differences in the use of political issues and images. International Society for Political Psychology, Washington, DC.

Young, J., & Osborne, R. (1990, April). Self monitoring and the self concept. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Aldrich, J., Borgida, E., Sullivan, J., Thomsen, C., & Young, J. (1987, September). When self interest makes a difference: A social cognitive model of political reasoning. American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL.

Young, J., Thomsen, C., & Borgida, E. (1987, May). The impact of chronic and temporary accessibility of self interest on memory for political information. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Young, J., & Snyder, M. (1987, May). Trait centrality, trait inconsistent information, and the self concept. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Young, J., & Borgida, E. (1984, May). Personal agendas and the relationship between self-interest and voting behavior. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.



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