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PARENTS & FAMILY CORNER

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Congratulations, your student has been accepted to Hunter College!

The Transition to College

The First Year

Looking Ahead……Beyond the First Year

What Hunter Parents Are Saying

Resources

Hunter College Campus Map

The Transition to College

The transition to college marks an exciting time in the lives of parents, family and students, however, it can also be a time filled with wonder and concern of what lies ahead. Getting information and knowing how to stay involved can be a daunting task. We are here to assist in the transition process.

Hunter College prides itself on offering students the opportunity to obtain an excellent educational experience right in the heart of New York City. Our vibrant and diverse campus, full of resources and a supportive environment, enables students to acquire the utmost in academics, as well as an experience that goes well beyond the classroom.

Hunter’s academic programs cover more than a hundred fields, providing students with a broad, well-rounded education that prepares them to meet the endless challenges of a rapid world, and serves them well throughout their lifetime.

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The First Year

As your student embarks on the journey that is “the college years”, we would like you to partner with us in your student’s academic success by keeping a few things in mind:

  • Be supportive. By realizing that your student will be coping with time management issues regarding the adjustment to college life and the task of finding and maintaining a balance between studying, working and socializing, your student should establish a routine time to study.  The general guideline is that for every hour the student spends in class, he/she will probably need to study two hours outside of class.
  • Keep the lines of communication open by talking with your student about some of the responsibilities and changes that are inevitably a part of making the transition to college.
  • Stay informed. Parents and family should inquire about resources available on campus. This includes becoming familiar with the rights of your student and your rights as parents or guardians. The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that protects the privacy of your student’s education records. (http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html). Information from your student’s record can only be discussed with them, unless there is written consent from the student. By law, records may only be disclosed without consent in special cases, mainly those involving health and safety emergencies. Family Policy Compliance Office of the US Department Of Education
  • The First Year is a time when students are faced with the challenge of learning college requirements, regulations and new disciplines. These are all intertwined with high expectations from their peers and faculty. Students should learn to take responsibility for their own academic progress by being aware of the resources that are available on campus. These include taking initiative and establishing contact with professors, academic advisors, personal counselors, and career counselors either in person or through email. These professionals are available to assist your student with the stressors and issues that are frequently associated with life on campus. Your student should take advantage of these resources and seek assistance when needed. Remember, these skills, coupled with the ability to solve their own problems, will ultimately benefit your student in their life after graduation.
  • Stay involved. Realizing that your student is an adult, both parents and family members should maintain a healthy level of involvement. You can encourage independence by allowing your student to make their own decisions, learn to do things for themselves, and ultimately learn from their mistakes. Try to demonstrate interest in the courses and subjects that your student is currently studying. Ask questions and share your enthusiasm. Inquire as to what their professors are like or what their favorite class happens to be. Continue to explore additional interests with your student.
  • It is also important for your student to get involved in campus activities and take advantage of athletics and the recreational facilities. This will ensure that your student establishes a sense of belonging and even help foster friendships and will also help develop your student’s identity, confidence and self-esteem.
  • Purchase health insurance for your student.  See theWellness Education/Health Services link for more information.
  • Consider discussing financial practices with your student. Address the importance of smart credit card usage and setting a budget for each semester. This may be an excellent time to investigate scholarship and grant opportunities. Additional information may be obtained by clicking on the Advising Services link.
  • Maintain awareness by being kept abreast of events and become familiar with college policies, rules and regulations. Your student’s Hunter College email account will be a critical source of such information; encourage them to check it on a regular basis.
  • Know that Hunter’s Academic Integrity Policy is taken very seriously. Advise your student on the importance of making sure that his/her assignments are properly cited, and that they do not participate in academic dishonesty, i.e. cheating and/or plagiarism. Support is available to students in the Reading and Writing Center for assistance in critical reading, comprehension and the writing process. http://rwc.hunter.cuny.edu/
  • Be safe. In an urban institution your student should be aware of his/her surroundings. Encourage your student to make intelligent, prudent decisions when it concerns their safety and/or the safety of others.
  • Parents and family should assist in the adjustment of the First Year by helping their student realize that college will be very different from high school. It is important to note that college is not an extension of high school, but rather a separate entity in itself. In high school there is a certain amount of structure in terms of schedule, but in college there is more freedom and certainly many choices. The key is for your student to understand that with this level of freedom comes certain responsibility. This includes setting time aside for studying and learning to meet and keep track of important deadlines. Procrastination may be a temptation, but it is certainly not a viable option.

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Looking Ahead……Beyond the First Year

As college life becomes routine for your student, parents and family should continue being a source of support.  With sophomore year looming in the near distance, the decision of choosing a major will be inevitable. During this time your student should be encouraged to begin exploring his/her interests and implement goals and objectives. Thinking about career choices and finding out about internship opportunities will be issues your student will have to address. With each step of the way your student will be moving closer and closer to that monumental and euphoric day we here at Hunter call GRADUATION!

In short, the First Year (and beyond) is full of struggles and triumphs. Help your student to excel by maintaining their individuality, encouraging independence and using creativity to achieve their goals and objectives. This is the path to academic success at Hunter College.

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What Hunter Parents Are Saying

“Crystal has made us so proud. She set these goals for herself and achieved them, surpassing all our expectations. Her graduation from Hunter College has meant so much to us and now she has set an example for her other siblings to follow.”  
— Parents of Crystal Washington, Graduated 2006

“I am an extremely proud and grateful parent of a Hunter College student. Thank You Hunter College for providing not only an excellent education, but also for the guidance and wonderful support you have provided my son”.
— Parent of Michael Akke, Graduated 2006

“I walk around with her graduation picture in my wallet showing it to friends and acquaintances that this is my daughter the Hunter College graduate. I am so happy she chose Hunter to learn and grow."
— Parent of Milagros Montalvo, Graduated 2006

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Resources

Student Services Links

Advising Services
Provides advising services to undergraduate students.

Career Development Services
Engages students in their pursuit of a major, finding an internship, and job searching.

Center for Student Achievement
Provides students with opportunities to develop and enhance their study methods.

Personal Counseling Services
Provides free and confidential individual and group counseling.

Health Services and Wellness Education
Provides health care delivery and information about important health related issues

International Students Office
Provides support services for international students.

Office of AccessABILITY
Enhances the educational experience for students with disabilities.

Education Abroad
Offers assistance with study abroad programs.

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Campus Life
Brookdale Residence Hall
Department of Public Safety
Hunter One Card

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Academics
Reading / Writing Center
Dolciani Mathematics Learning Center
Thomas Hunter Honors Program
Hunter Libraries

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General Information                                                      
Scholarships/Grants
Testing Center
Hunter College Bookstore 
Office of Financial Aid
OASIS / Registrar

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Books for Parents/ Family
Resources that can help your student’s transition from high school to college:

Almost Grown: Launching Your Child from High School to College by Patricia Pasick, M.Ed., Ph.D., published by W.W. Norton.

Don’t Tell Me What to Do, Just Send Money: The Essential Parenting Guide to the College Years, by Helen E. Johnson, Christine Schelhas-Miller.

In Addition to Tuition: The Parent’s Survival Guide to Freshman Year of College by Borden, Marian Edelman, Mary Anne Burlinson, Elise R. Kearns.

Letting Go: A Parents Guide to Understanding the College Years (4th Edition) By Karen Levine Coburn and Madge Lawrence Treeger.

Parents, Family, and the New College Student Experience by Dr. Kent D. Beeler, published by the University of Indianapolis Press.

When Kids Go To College: A Parents Guide to Changing Relationships, by Barbara M. Newman and Philip Newman.

You’re On Your Own (But I’m Here if You Need Me): Mentoring your Child During the College Years by Marjorie Savage, published by Fireside Books.

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