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LIVE STREAM OF CELEBRATION OF AUDRE LORDE

 

BIOGRAPHY

Audre Geraldine Lorde was the third child of Linda Belmar and Frederic Lorde born on February 18, 1943. Born Audrey, she dropped the "y" from her name while still a child, explaining in Zami: A New Spelling of My Name, that she was attracted to the symmetry of the "e" at the end of each name.  Influenced by her mother's love for words and storytelling, Lorde was drawn to poetry and language from a young age. Her schooling began at a Catholic grammar school where she experienced racism and hostility. It was during this time that Lorde first began to develop her literary voice; as a teen she was an active contributor to her school arts magazine and published her first poem in Seventeen magazine. Lorde attended Hunter College (1954-1959) studying Library Science and went on to earn a Master's degree in that subject from Columbia University in 1961. There she met Edwin Ashley Rollins, an attorney, whom she married in 1962. Lorde and Rollins wedding reception took place at Roosevelt House. The couple had two children, Elizabeth and Jonathan; they divorced in 1970. In 1968, Lorde was a writer in residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi where she met Frances Clayton, a professor of psychology, who was her partner until 1989.

Mina Shaughnessy, former director of City College's SEEK Program (Search for Education, Elevation, and Knowledge) offered Lorde her first position at CUNY. From there, she went to John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 1970 where she fought to build a significant Black Studies program. In 1981, she accepted the Distinguished Thomas Hunter Chair offered by Donna Shalala, then Hunter College's president, where she taught until 1986. Lorde also taught in the Department of English; today an annual prize for undergraduate excellence in poetry and prose is named in her honor. Lorde was a mentor at the Audre Lorde Women's Poetry Center, housed at Roosevelt House in the 1980s-90s prior to its renovation.

In 1980, together with Barbara Smith and Cherrie Moraga, she co-founded Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press in order to call attention and make available work by women of color. As a prolific poet, talented teacher and artist, and well known activist, Lorde has been acclaimed as a central figure in the feminist movement. In 1991-92, Lorde was the State Poet of New York.

In the late 1970s, Lorde was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a radical mastectomy; she died on November 17, 1992 ofliver cancer in St. Croix where she was living with Gloria Joseph. In her own words, she was a "black, lesbian, feminist, mother, warrior, poet"; Lorde's life and career was characterized by her hopeful efforts to establish a better humanity through her teaching, activism, poetry and prose.


This biography is compiled from a number of sources, from entries found at "e-notes", poets.org, and from Columbia University's Center for New Media Teaching and Learning as well as Clare Coss and Blanch Wiesen Cook's entry in Notable American Women. Special thanks to Thorn in the Department of English for providing some details about Lorde's time teaching at Hunter.

 

 

Daniel G. Simmonds, III

 
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Meet Our Faculty

 

FACULTY

 

Catherine Raissiguier

Professor/Director
212-772-5509
Room: West 1715
catherine.raissiguier@hunter.cuny.edu

Catherine Raissiguier completed her undergraduate education in France and holds a M.A. in Women's Studies/American Studies and a Ph.D. in Comparative and International Education from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She is the author of Reinventing the Republic: Gender, Migration, and Citizenship in France (Stanford University Press, 2010) and Becoming Women/Becoming Workers: Identity Formation in a French High School (SUNY Press, 1994).  Dr. Raissiguier has taught Women's and Gender Studies at SUNY/Buffalo, the University of Michigan, Middlebury College, University of Oregon, Oregon State University, and the University of Cincinnati. She chaired the Women's and Gender Studies program at New Jersey City University (NJCU) from 2003 to 2010 and continued teaching at NJCU till June 2014. She will be joining the Hunter College faculty in 2014 and will be the Director of the Women and Gender Studies Program.

 

Jennifer Gaboury

Lecturer and Associate Director
212-772-5559
Room: West 1716
jgaboury@hunter.cuny.edu

Jennifer Gaboury is the Associate Director of Women and Gender Studies at Hunter College. She is currently serving as Board Chair for the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies based at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her work is related to issues of masculinities, feminisms, and politics.

 

Rupal Oza

Associate Professor
212-650-3035
Room: West 1718
rupal.oza@hunter.cuny.edu

Rupal Oza was the Director of the Women and Gender Studies Program at Hunter College, CUNY. Her book, The Making of Neoliberal India: Nationalism, Gender, and the Paradoxes of Globalization was published by Routledge, New York and from Women Unlimited, India. She has several articles in peer reviewed journals. Her current project is on examining the link between special economic zones and the discourse of security in India.

 

ADJUNCT FACULTY

 

Diana Cage

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
dc20@hunter.cuny.edu

Diana Cage is a lecturer in Women and Gender Studies at Hunter, where she teaches courses in the Sexualities concentration, including Intro to LGBTQI Studies and Our Bodies, Our Politics. Her areas of interest include queer studies (specifically, the history of sexuality and sociology of gender), feminism and pornography, and the medicalization of female sexuality. Professor Cage is the author of seven books, most recently Mind Blowing Sex: A Woman's Guide (Seal Press, 2012) and The Lesbian Sex Bible (Quiver, 2014). Her writing examines female and queer sexuality and power as well as lesbian and queer experiences of sex and relationships. Cage holds an MFA from San Francisco State University.

 

Veronica Cassidy

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
vcassidy@hunter.cuny.edu

Veronica Cassidy is a writer and educator based in New York City.In addition to teaching at Hunter College, she also works at Stella & Charles Guttman Community College. She manages The Universal Condition, a blog about gender, trauma and mental illness. Her research focuses on the impact of mental health issues within the classroom, and the transformative potential of education. She is working on a children's book titled,You Always Have a Friend in You, and lives with her two beloved bulldogs.

 

Michael Fisher

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
mfisher@hunter.cuny.edu

Michael Philip Fisher is an adjunct lecturer in Women and Gender Studies at Hunter College, where he teaches courses in feminist/queer theory, science studies, and political economy. His main area of interest is the coarticulation of race, gender, and sexuality with the major concepts of American liberalism--freedom, equality, citizenship, property--over the course of American political development, with an especial focus on period spanning from the Stamp Act crisis to the rise of Jeffersonianism.  He is also a translator of Baudelaire and is at work on a series of prose translations of the Tableaux Parisiens that emphasize the affective, bodily experience of urbanization--both in Baudelaire's Paris and our New York.  He gives an especially killer lecture on Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory and runs a restaurant in his spare time.

 

Dillonna Lewis

Adjunct Lecturer
212-650-3569
Room: East 1222
illewis@hunter.cuny.edu

Dillonna holds a Master's degree in Education and Counseling Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University. She is the recipient of the Brawley Award, which funded a research project at the University of the West Indies in Barbados, West Indies to document the impact of racism, sexism and poverty on women in Caribbean society. She has served on the Board of Directors at Project Fair, and as a member of the New York Women's Foundation Grants Advisory/Allocations Committee. As Welfare Rights Initiative (WRI) Co-Executive Director, she shares responsibility for overall governance, funding, programming development and leadership.  Dillonna supervises and trains staff, interns and undergraduate students to operate and evaluate WRI's programs. She also plans, develops and implements projects in support of WRI's mission and vision for social change.  Dillonna instructs WRI's (two-semester, credit-bearing) Community Leadership training courses (WGSP 398.00 & 490.00) at Hunter College that's offered in Women and Gender Studies and cross-listed in Sociology.  The Community Leadership Training Program curriculum is designed to promote interactive learning among students with firsthand experience of poverty, scholars, advocates, organizers, service providers and activists engaged in welfare policy discussions. The program exposes students to information about the social welfare system and develops their capacity as leaders, organizers and trainers of others who seek to influence the public policies that affect their lives.  In its 19th year, the Community Leadership program has trained close to 500 students to serve as leaders in welfare and education public policy discourse, and as agents of real change in their communities.

 

Boon Lin Ngeo

Adjunct Assistant Professor
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
bngeo@hunter.cuny.edu

Dr. Ngeo, Boon Lin is Chinese Malaysian. He was an award-winning journalist before he came to the United States in 1997. He has published extensively in the Chinese language since 1999, and is the author of more than 30 books and numerous bestsellers in Malaysia. He holds a BA degree in sociology from university of Wisconsin, a MA degree in sociology from Minnesota State University, a Master of Theological Studies from Episcopal Divinity School, and a  doctoral degree in theology from Boston University. He is also a doctoral candidate in sociology. Dr. Ngeo is a staff pastor of MCC New York, and the first openly gay minister in his native country Malaysia, and the first openly gay minister who holds a doctoral degree in theology in Asia. He is one of the most sought after speakers in LGBTI Chinese communities in Asia, such as China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Malaysia. His activisim in Asia has been reported by CNN and the New York Times. He also has been named as one of the most inspiring LGBT religious leaders in the world by Huffington Post. 

 

Christopher Mitchell

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
cm549@hunter.cuny.edu

Chris Mitchell is an adjunct professor of women's, gender and sexuality studies at Hunter College, where he teaches about feminist intellectual and political traditions and the history of gender and sexuality. He also teaches United States and queer history at Rutgers University-Newark and men and masculinities at Pace University. He currently serves on the Board of Directors at CLAGS: The Center for LGBT Studies at the CUNY Graduate School. He holds a B.A. in English and history from Texas Tech University. He currently attends Rutgers University in New Brunswick, where he is completing a dissertation on the role of markets in the history of queer community formation, Gay Liberation, and race, class, and gender stratification in New York City from 1945 to 1980.
--
Christopher Adam Mitchell
Adjunct Professor of History and Women's/Gender Studies, Rutgers University-Newark, Hunter College at CUNY, and Pace University
Ph.D. Candidate, History, Rutgers University

 

Nomvuyo Nolutshungu

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
nnolutshu@hunter.cuny.edu

Nomvuyo Nolutshungu is an Adjunct Lecturer at WGS whose interests include transitional justice, human rights, and transnational sexuality and gender studies. A PhD candidate in political science at the CUNY Graduate Center, her dissertation is on discourses of global justice. She has worked in international organization research and programming at the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies, and Security Council Report. She has been an instructor at Hunter, John Jay and Baruch Colleges of the City University of New York.

 

Benjamin Persky

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
bpersky@hunter.cuny.edu

Benjamin Eleanor Adam is a Ph.D. student in Sociology at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. His work focuses on gender and sexuality in relation to pornography, technology, and posthumanism. Benjamin regularly teaches Sex Wars: Feminist Perspective on Pornography, Queer Theory, Transgender Theory and Politics, Classics of Feminist Theory, and Gender, Sexuality, and Science. Benjamin is listed in the course catalog under the name Benjamin Persky.

 

Susan Rosenberg

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
susan.rosenberg@hunter.cuny.edu

Susan Rosenberg is a human rights and prisoners rights advocate, adjunct professor, communications consultant, award-winning writer, public speaker and a formerly incarcerated person.  Her recently published memoir, An American Radical, details her 16 years in federal prison as well as her conclusions about her prison experience and her past. She was released from prison in 2001 through executive clemency by then President Bill Clinton. Upon her release she worked at American Jewish World Service for 12 years beginning as a writer then becoming the director of communications. Post-AJWS Susan has worked extensively in the nonprofit communications field with a focus on human rights and international development.. She is the founder of Sync It Communications, a communications-consulting group. She is also an adjunct professor at Hunter College and a member of the prison writing committee of PEN America. Susan lives in New York City with her partner.

 

John Paul Sanchez

Adjunct Associate Professor
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
js2142@hunter.cuny.edu

John Paul Sanchez, MD, MPH is Assistant Professor; Emergency Department, Chairperson; Einstein LGBT Steering CommitteePrincipal Investigator; Building the Next Generationof Academic Physicians Initiative, www.bngap.org Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Chair, Council of Young PhysiciansNational Hispanic Medical Association. He is the co-organizer of the LGBT Health Workforce Conference.· He serves as a Board Member of the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies (CLAGS) of the City University of New York and focuses on LGBT health education and health disparities.· CLAGS is the first university based LGBT research center in the United States and provides a platform for intellectual leadership in addressing issues that affect Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender individuals and other sexual and gender minorities.· He also serves as the Chairperson of the Einstein LGBT Steering Committee of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and is charged with building a supportive institutional climate for the personal and professional development of students.· He previously served as founding Board Member of the Bronx Lesbian and Gay Health Resource Consortium (2000-2005) and as a Steering Committee Member for the Group of Diversity and Inclusion of the Association of American Medical Colleges (2009-2011).

 

Raymond Joshua Scannell

Adjunct Lecturer
212-396-6706
Room: West 1636
rs999@hunter.cuny.edu

Raymond Joshua Scannell is a PhD student in sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center. His work focuses on the intersections of embodiment, technology, incarceration and political economy. He is the author of Cities: Unauthorized Resistance and Uncertain Sovereignty in the New Urban World (2011) and with Patricia Clough et al. of "The Datalogical Turn" in Nonrepresentational Methodologies (2014). 

 

Portia Seddon

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
pseddon@hunter.cuny.edu

Portia Seddon is an anthropologist and lecturer in Women & Gender Studies. Her areas of interest include race, gender, social movements and ethnomusicology, with recent work covering the intersections between populism and Afrofuturism in urban dance-music cultures. Prof. Seddon's current research examines sexual violence and morality in Jamaican dancehall music. She earned her M.A. in Anthropology from Hunter College.

 

Erin Siodmak

Adjunct Lecturer
212-396-6706
Room: West 1636
esiodmak@hunter.cuny.edu

Erin Siodmak is a PhD candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center. She likes to study art, film, social theory, cities, geography, gender, and a lot more. Her dissertation is on performance and installation art, politics, and development in New York, New Orleans, and Detroit. Erin has been teaching at Hunter (and loving it) since 2008. When not teaching or studying, Erin likes to watch whole seasons of TV shows, ski, or play with her dog, Dolly Parton.

 

Stephanie St. Pierre

Adjunct Lecturer
212-772-5284
Room: West 1739
sstpierr@hunter.cuny.edu

Stephanie St. Pierre, in 2010, began teaching at Hunter College and currently teaches courses that explore gender, health, food and public policy (not necessarily all at the same time) including: Introduction to Gender and Sexualities; Gender and Health Policy; Gender, Sexualities and Indigenous Rights; Gender, Globalization and the Politics of Food; and Feminist Activism and Advocacy/Internship Seminar. At other colleges she has taught: Women's Health; Nutrition & Society; Public Health Ethics; and Health Education.

Stephanie St. Pierre is a candidate for the DPH in Public Health at the Graduate Center and recently began fieldwork for her dissertation "Exploring Food System Change and Food Sovereignty in Indigenous Communities of North America." Her broader research interests include indigenous rights, gender and public policy, community health and food systems, environmental justice, bioethics and impacts of trauma on community health.

Recently Stephanie St. Pierre was appointed to the governing board of The Feminist Press.  She is currently chair-elect of the Ethics Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and in 2013 she completed
6 years as a member of the publications board for APHA Press.  She also serves on the local environmental advisory committees of the community in which she lives. With filmmaker Therese Shechter, Ms. St. Pierre was co-producer of the film "I Was a Teenaged Feminist" and served on the expert advisory board for Shechter's 2013 film "How to Lose Your Virginity."

Stephanie St. Pierre has an MPH in Health, Policy and Management from Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, a Master's in Divinity from Union Theological Seminary, where she focused her studies on bioethics and environmental justice, and a Bachelor's degree in Fine Art from Brown University. Before working in public health and academia, she spent over twenty years in the field of children's publishing as an author, editor and publishing executive.  She continues to write for children and adults about the many things that interest her.