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Courses Fall 2022

Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses

 

GERMN 101: Elementary German I (3 hours, 3 credits)

For beginners with no previous knowledge of German; course description below.

 

GERMN 102: Elementary German II (3 hours, 3 credits)

Course description below.

 

GERMN 103: Intensive Elementary German (6 hours, 6 credits)

For beginners with no previous knowledge of German; course description below.

 

GERMN 201: Intermediate German I (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent

Course description below.

 

GERMN 202: Intermediate German II (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent

Course description below.

 


 

Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level I
(What is the difference between Level I and Level II courses?)

 

GERMN 32000 (Studies in German Literature & Language) - German Geographies: Talking About Travel (3 hours, 3 credits)

Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent.

Course description below. Fulfills GER 3/A and Pluralism & Diversity Group D.

 

GERMN 32029 (Studies in German Literature & Language) - Contemporary Minority Voices in Germany (3 hours, 3 credits)
Prereq: GERMN 202 or 203 or equivalent.

Course description below. Fulfills GER 3/A and Pluralism & Diversity Group D.


Advanced German Language, Literature and Culture Courses: Level II

 

GERMN 38501: The German Press of Today: Reading & Understanding Magazines & Newspapers (3 hours, 3 credits)

Prereq: One course numbered from GERMN 320 to 359 or equivalent.

Section
Days
Time
Code
Instructor
Room
01 Mon & Thur
2:30pm-3:45pm 40624
Nicolai 509A HW

Course description below. Fulfills GER 3/A and Pluralism & Diversity Group D.

 


Courses in German Literature & Civilization (Conducted in English)

 

GERMN 241: German Fairy Tales (3 hours, 3 credits)
Pre- or Coreq: ENGL 120.

Fulfills the "Creative Expression" category of the Hunter core or GER 2/C.
Fulfills Pluralism & Diversity Group D. Writing Intensive.

Course description below.

 

Course Descriptions

Elementary & Intermediate German Language Courses

GERMN 101:  Elementary German I  3hrs, 3crs.

No pre-req

This course is for beginners without prior knowledge of German. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 1. ISBN 9781524996246

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 102:  Elementary German II  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 101 or equivalent.

This course continues the work of GERMN 101. It broadens linguistic and cultural abilities for basic communication in a German-speaking environment. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 2. ISBN 9781524996253.  

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 103:  Intensive Elementary German  6hrs, 6crs.

No pre-req

This course is for beginners without prior knowledge of German. It covers in ONE semester the material normally covered in two semesters, in GERMN 101-102. It focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural abilities needed to function in German-speaking countries. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 1. ISBN 9781524996246 AND Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 2. ISBN 9781524996253

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 201:  Intermediate German I  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 102 or 103 or equivalent.

This course is the third in a four-semester sequence and continues the linguistic and cultural introduction to German. Review and practice of elementary grammar; introduction of advanced forms. Reading and discussion of selected texts. The instructor will emphasize active student participation (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Regular attendance and daily homework are necessary to succeed in this course.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 3. ISBN 9780201814224

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

GERMN 202:  Intermediate German II  3hrs, 3crs.

Prereq: GERMN 201 or equivalent.

Continued broadening of abilities in speaking, listening, reading, writing. Reading and discussion of selected literary texts. Strong emphasis on active student participation. Regular attendance and daily homework are important elements in this course. Completion of this course fulfills the Hunter College foreign language requirement. Students at this level will normally be tested by both written and oral examination.
Exam format: written quizzes, midterm and final exams
Textbook: Access to German, Jägerbuch, Vol 3. ISBN 9780201814224

Note: If you have previous knowledge of German, please contact the department for advice and placement.

 

Advanced German Language, Literature & Culture Courses

What is the difference between Level I and Level II advanced courses?

The advanced German courses are divided into two levels.  We expect students to take at least two literature courses at Level I before proceeding to Level II.  If you are in any doubt as to which course you should take, or if you have previous knowledge of German, please consult the chair of the department.

Level I courses are intended for students who have recently completed GERMN 202 or 203 and who have only limited experience discussing German literature in German, orally and in writing. They are not intended for native speakers.

Level II courses are intended for advanced students who have taken a number of 300-level German language and literature courses and who may be interested in going on to use the German language professionally. They are thus meant to help students move to the highest levels of the undergraduate program and beyond.

 

GERMN 32000 German Geographies: Talking About Travel (CUNYfirst title = Studies in German Literature & Language)

Prereq: GERMN 202/203 or equivalent

How do we experience the world through language and places? This is a guiding question of this course, as we explore concepts of home, travel, landmarks, and lanscapes/geographies and various authors' (and our own) relationships to them. Texts incluce blogs, websites, music, tv episodes, and short-to-medium length writings such as poems, short stories, essays, and articles, organized around topics such as: Zuhause/Gast/Femde; Reisen/die Stadt/Sehenswürdigkeiten; Natur/Garten/Wald; Sprache und Zeit

There will be regular discussion and short informal presentations, as well as one longer presentation (5-10 minutes) around midterm and a longer projct by the end of the semester. Frequent short written assignments, as well as one longer (2-5 page) essay to be revised on an individual basis. You will improve and build on your language skills, speaking and writing with greater sophistication (increased vocabulary, more accurate grammar) and increased confidence, and reading with a good understanding of a variety of texts by the end of the semester.

This is a zero-cost course: all materials will be provided by the instructor via Blackboard links and in-class handouts.

Course requirements: Regular preparation of readings and active participataion; regular short writing assignments and presentations; one longer essay and one project

 

GERMN 32029 Contemporary Minority Voices in Germany

Prereq: GERMN 202/203 or equivalent

There are preconceived notions of what Germans look like, their traditions, their language, etc. But recent articles from Die Zeit and the New York Times point out that one quarter of the German population has a 'migration background,' and with more immigrants including refugees coming to Germany, this number is expected to increase. These people, among them writers, poets, and filmmakers, challenge traditional ideas of what it means to be German and how to live and survive in a country that often struggles to create inclusive spaces for people of diverse backgrounds. In this course, we will hear the voices of Turkish-Germans, German and Russian Jews, Afro-Germans, "ethnic German" repatriates, refugees, and others through their literary works and films. We will investigate the work of immigrants; ethnic, national and religious minority writers; and bilingual writers.

Required text: Ika Hügel-Marshall, Dahein unterwegs ISBN 3897716046 OR 978-3897716049

Provided by instructor: May Ayim, "Blues in schwarz-weiss," Emine S. Özdamar, "Der Hof im Spiegel," Yoko Tawada, "Wo Europa anfängt," Fatih Akin, "Aus dem Nichts" & "Tschick"

Regular reading, attendance, and participation; regular writing assignments; quizzes; presentations; group project

 

GERMN 38501 The German Press of Today: Reading & Understanding Newspapers & Magazines

Prereq: One course numbered from 320 to 349 or 444 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

The aim of the course is two-fold: (1) to give an introduction to the main types of printed and online news sources available in German today (newspapers, magazines, weeklies from Germany, Switzerland and Austria); and (2) to provide experience in reading them. After providing a historical background of the development of German print media after 1945, we will keep abreast with German news on politics, culture, education, etc. by paying particular attention to content, style and readership. Each student will choose one topic of personal interest in the news that they will follow over the course of the semester and occasionally present on in class.

Exam format: midterm and final exams.


Courses Conducted in English

GERMN 241:  German Fairy Tales  "W"

Pre- or Coreq: ENGL 120

Fairy tales are known all over the world. The most famous European book of fairy tales is the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. These stories have entered our collective unconscious but are not easily explained. We shall look at various attempts at explaining what fairy tales are all about, look at older stories that served as models for the Brothers Grimm and study modern versions of the tales including scenes from Walt Disney movies and "politically correct fairy tales." Students will read fairy tales, tell one that they know, and there will be regular written assignments, a midterm and final examination. All readings, discussions and written work will be in English. This course has a "W" designation.  

Course requirements: attendance and participation; regular preparation of readings; regular writing assignments.
Exam Format: written midterm and final exams
Textbooks: Jack Zipes, The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, ISBN 978-0553382167
Joanna Cole, Best-Loved Folktales of the World, ISBN 978-0318796482 or ISBN 9780385189491

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