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Spring 2021 Undergraduate Courses

Please note: Course offerings subject to change.

HIST 11200: World History 1500 to the Present
Instructor: Melson / Asynchronous
This course is a survey of world history from the 16th century until the present. Our focus will be the evolution of global connections and interactions that led to unprecedented movements of people, ideas, technologies, and microbes during this time period. As novel forms of migration and rule crossed our world, they propelled new forms of domination and resistance. We will explore how these processes impacted the causes and consequences of the slave trade, imperial domination, decolonization, and nationalism. Specific case studies will illuminate these events by exploring how global processes effected local contexts and vice-versa. Particular emphasis will be placed on how historians analyze primary source material, interpret, and debate the past. Finally, this course will reorient students away from a western perspective to highlight global and alternative histories that are often ignored within broad historical surveys.
For College: Fulfills CUNY Common Core (World Cultures).
For History Majors
: Counts as Non-US/Non-Europe 


HIST 12200: 19th and 20th Century Europe
Instructor Spritzer/ Mon-Th 8:10-9:25
Instructor Woltering / Asynchronous

History of modern Europe between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, covering Western, Eastern Europe, and Russia. The focus of this course is upon political history but topics related to economy, culture and the arts are included as well. We start with the French Revolution of 1789 and complete the course with the collapse of communism and the Soviet Union in 1991. We will analyze how the concept of Europe changed over time; how colonies turned into nation states, and how these nations transformed during the modern era; why, how, and when some states adopted totalitarian models; and how colonialism and totalitarianism came to an end in Europe after WWII. Themes include: the French Revolution and Revolutionary Wars, romanticism, liberalism, socialism and Marxism, 1848, empire and nation states, European imperialism, WWI, interwar radicalism, Nazism, fascism, and Stalinism, WWII, the Holocaust, cold war, European Union, the collapse of communism, and the creation of a new Europe. Lectures will be supplemented by weekly readings from the textbook and primary sources. Students will learn to work with primary sources and incorporate them into historical analysis.
For College: Fulfills Pluralism and Diversity requirement (Group D).
For History Majors: Counts as European


HIST 15100: United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War
Instructor Reynolds / Asynchronous
Instructor Gelfand / Tues 8:10-9:25 or 9:45-11 or 2:30-3:25
Instructor Ranlet / Mon-Thurs 2:45 - 4:00 or 4:10 - 5:25

This course will cover U.S. History broadly from the early period of European settlement to the conclusion of the Civil War. The course will include at least one focused study of a particular topic or event from this period.
For College: Fulfills CUNY Common Core (US Experience).
For History Majors: Counts as US and Prior to 1800


HIST 15200: United States from the Civil War to the Present
Instructors Woltering / Asynchronous
Instructor Rosenberg / Asynchronous Lectures + Discussion Sections on Tues or Fri @ 12:10
Instructor Contreras / Mon 2:45-4
Instructor Kocurek / Tues-Thur 4:10-5:25
Instructor Bellows / Mon-Wed 4:10-5:25
Instructor Hurewitz / 11:10-12:25

This course surveys some of the major developments in United States history from 1865 to the 1970s. Among the subjects covered are the struggles for justice of African Americans and women; the expanding scope and power of the federal government; and the increasing engagement of the United States with the world.
For College: Fulfills CUNY Common Core (US Experience).
For History Majors: Counts as US


HIST 21100: Medieval Civilization
Instructor Melson / Asynchronous
The thousand year period between the collapse of the Roman Empire and the beginnings of the modern age were a dynamic, action-packed era which saw the birth of many modern social institutions, including universities, systematized law, centralized government, and the romance novel, just to name a few. We will approach the course with the following goals in mind: to understand the social, institutional, economic, cultural, and religious shifts that occurred during this period; to understand the continuities of medieval thought and society and to be able to explain its relationship to the periods before and after the Middle Ages; to be able to critically analyze primary sources, and to understand how to use primary sources to forward a historical argument; and to understand how historical interpretations of a topic or event themselves change over time.
For History Majors
: Counts as European


HIST 25022: Gender in Modern Jewish History (crosslist JS 25004)
Instructor Welt  / Mon-Thurs 9:45-11
This course will explore how Jewish men and women, informed by intra-Jewish debates and interactions with the empires in which they lived, constructed the gendered norms of the larger Jewish world. This course will pay particular attention to the ways in which Jewish women carved out spaces in politics, economic activity, and religious life across the Jewish diaspora in Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Students will also grapple with how Jewish masculinity has been conceived and performed during different moments of modern Jewish history. As the course probes Jewish encounters with the rise of global capitalism, the forging of imperial networks and nation-states, mass migrations, and Zionist state-building, students will learn how gender integrally shaped the modern Jewish experience. 
For History Majors: Counts as Non-US/Non-Europe


HIST 25076: History of Modern South Asia
Instructor Bhagavan / Tue-Fri 2:10-3:25
This course is designed to introduce students to the civilization(s) of the subcontinent from the coming of the Mughals in 1526 to the present. We will examine aspects of South Asia’s diverse political, social, and cultural histories. “South Asia” here refers to the contemporary countries of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. No prior knowledge of South Asian history or culture is expected or required. 
For History Majors: Counts as Non-US/Non-Europe


HIST 25082: History of Jewish Mysticism
Instructor Ruben / Mon-Thurs 1:10-2:25
This course will examine the important mystical stream within Jewish thought from its origins in the bible to the present day through the lenses of theory as well as mystical experience.
For History Majors
: Counts as Europe

HIST 27200: History of Latin America in the 19th and 20th Centuries (crosslist LACS 43478)
Instructor John / Tues-Fri 9;45 -11
This course explores key topics in the History of Latin America from the struggles for Independence through the present day. These include the rise of Latin American liberalism to upheavals like the Mexican Revolution, the birth of nationalist and populist mass politics, the Cuban Revolution and the counterinsurgency wars in Central America to the neoliberal" and "pink tide" trends of recent decades, and today's turbulence in many parts of the region. Using texts as well as music and video, we will study social, political and cultural aspects of the history of this varied and vibrant region whose importance for the U.S. and New York City in particular keeps growing. 
For History Majors: Counts as Non-US/Non-Europe


HIST 27651: Modern Middle East from 1800 - Present
Instructor Kern / Mon-Thurs 11:10-12:25 or 4:10-5:25
History 27651 is a survey of Middle East history spanning from the 16th century, during the period of the time of the great Ottoman and Persian empires, to the present. This course introduces modern Middle East history through the voices of the makers of that history and, consequently, the majority of the primary sources are translations of works written by scholars, intellectuals, and artists from the region. In addition, films in English or subtitled will be shown during the semester. Geographically, the course concentrates on lands of the former Ottoman Empire, particularly present day Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, and North Africa, plus Iran. Thematically, topics covered are concerned with state formation and the impact of European imperialism on Middle East politics and society. The primary focus of the course is on intellectual history and examines the views of scholars on issues such as nationalism, pan-Arabism, political Islam, women’s rights, colonization, decolonization, and revolutions.
Fulfills Pluralism and Diversity requirement (Group A).
For History Majors
: Counts as Non-US/Non-Europe


HIST 29000: History Practicum (W)
Instructor Rosenthal / Tues 9:45-11 or 12:45 - 2
Instructor Bhagavan / Tues 11:10 - 12:25
A writing intensive seminar intended to help history majors develop their skills as historians. Each section of this course may focus on a different historical theme and so students will encounter different readings and topics. But in all sections of this course students will learn to locate, critically assess, and interpret primary sources, both textual and non-textual; analyze and critique a range of secondary sources for both methodological and historiographical purposes; and develop, draft, and revise a strong and effective research paper by learning how to construct a thesis, organize a paper, devise a bibliography, and cite sources following the Chicago Manual of Style.
Writing Intensive Course.
Prereq: ENGL 12000; 6 cr in history and declared history major.


HIST 30000: Historical Research (W)
Various Instructors
A HIST 300 project is an independent research project developed while working one-on-one with a faculty member. The project must be related to a 300-level history course that the student has already taken with that professor, or will have completed prior to beginning the project. The final product of the project is usually a 20-page research paper.
To register for HIST 300, write the professor you would like to work with and determine if they are available to work with you for the next semester. Once the professor has agreed, forward that email to Ms. Adams, the History Department Administrator, at cadams@hunter.cuny.edu and include your EMPL ID#. She will put permission for you to register into CUNY First.
Please note that there is no predefined class meeting time; instead students work out a schedule with their faculty advisor.
For History Majors: HIST 29000 is a prerequisite.


HIST 31900: Jewish History in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods (W)
Instructor Ruben / Mon-Thurs 11:10-12:25
From the 18th century to the present: Enlightenment, Jewish emancipation and nationalism, a Jewish state; anti-Semitism and the Holocaust; recent trends. 
For College: Fulfills Pluralism and Diversity requirement (Group D).
For History Majors
: Counts as European


HIST 32100: History of the Holocaust (Crosslist JS 41054)
Instructor Casper / Mon-Thurs 2:45-4:00
This course examines the fate of European Jewry between 1933 and 1945. Following an introduction to Jewish history and the historical background of anti-Semitic ideology, we will cover: the rise and fall of the democratic Weimar Republic in the 1920s; the Nazi seizure of power; anti-Jewish policy and legislation in Nazi Germany; ghettoization in Nazi Europe; and, the conception and implementation of the Final Solution during the Second World War. Additional topics will include discussions of the Jewish Councils, Jewish resistance, life in the ghettos and camps, the Jewish Question and public opinion in Nazi-occupied Europe, and the reactions of the Allies, the Church, and world Jewry to the Holocaust.
For History Majors: Counts as European


HIST 33400: France During the Revolution and Napoleonic Era
Instructor Spritzer / Mon-Thurs 9:45-11
A study of 18th-century antecedents of the French Revolution, the Revolutionary decade, and the Napoleonic Era. 
For History Majors: Counts as European


HIST 3411J: Terror and the Constituion: Free Speech & National Security in the US Since 1886
Instructor Haverty-Stacke / Tues-Fri 11:10-12:25
This course explores the history of free speech in America and the various attempts to curtail it in the name of national security from the turbulent decades of the Progressive era through the uneasy years since the attack on the United States on September 11, 2001. It pays particular attention to key moments of stress during which the national security state first emerged, expanded, and took on a life of its own. In this class we will consider various real and alleged threats to America’s security, including anarchism, socialism, communism, and modern variants of domestic and foreign terrorism. We will also explore the evolving government responses to such threats including the creation and expansion of the FBI. We will explore the rise of modern free speech constitutional theory in landmark Supreme Court cases, like Schenck, Dennis, and Brandenburg. And we will examine the history of organizations, like the ACLU, which emerged in the context of the struggle to defend first amendment rights in the wake of state-sponsored abuses.
For History Majors
: Counts as US


HHIST 3411U: China Since 1911
Instructor Belsky/ Tues 9:45-11
An overview of post-imperial China.  Major themes include: the historical legacies and unfulfilled promises of China's republican period; the rise of the Communist party and the rule of the Communist party/state; Maoist and post-Mao period policies; social, cultural, political trends; and China's changing position in the world order over time.
For History Majors
: Counts as Non-US / Non-European


IST 3412I: Mapping Jewish New York (Crosslist JS 40005)
Instructor Welt / Wed 10:10-12:40
This course will explore the history of Jewish New York up close and in person. Each week will entail walking tours of historic neighborhoods in the city that reveal the story of American Jews in the nation's largest city. While we navigate the historic Jewish spaces in New York, students will also learn about the political, cultural, and economic history of American Jewry.
For History Majors: Counts as US


HIST 3412P: Andean Region Since 1800
Instructor John / Tues-Fri 2:10-3:25
For History Majors: Counts as Non-US / Non-European


HIST 35900: Immigration & Ethnicity in the US
Instructor Contreras / Weds 10:10-11:30
In this course we will examine the historical experiences of immigrants and their families in the United States with an emphasis on the variety of experiences among migrants, and the reasons for them. Learning Objectives include an understanding of the chronological sequence and historical context of foreign migration to the United States, the major issues and events of American immigration history, and the ability to analyze and contextualize relevant documents.
For History Majors: Counts as US


HIST 38235: Gandhi - Power, Protest & Justice in the 20th-Century
Instructor Bhagavan / Fri 11:10 - 12:25

This class will explore in-depth the life, thought, and legacies of Mohandas K. Gandhi, the famed proponent of non-violent resistance and leader of the twentieth-century anti-colonial campaign in India. We will critically discuss a broad range of topics including, but not limited to, Gandhi’s role(s) in and thoughts on nationalism and identity politics; class/caste/ethnic/religious conflict; protest, non-violence, and resistance; and mass mobilization.
For History Majors
: Counts as Non-US / Non-European


HIST 38236: History of the American Revolution
Instructor Gelfand / Tues 3:45-5:00
This upper-level seminar examines the origins of the American Revolution and the creation of the United States. It begins by looking at colonial America in the mid-eighteenth century and continues through the era of Jefferson’s presidency at the start of the nineteenth century. While a major focus is on the political ideas and events of the age, the social and cultural ramifications of the Revolution will also be explored, especially regarding the experiences of women, Native Americans, African Americans, and Loyalists.
For History Majors
: Counts as US


HIST 38267: War and Society in 20th Century US
Instructor Rosenberg / Thurs 5:35-6:50
This course will explore the way war has influenced domestic life in twentieth-century America.
For History Majors
: Counts as US


HIST 38461: Hitler's Germany
Instructor Hett / Mon-Thurs 1:10-2:25
This seminar will deal with some of the major issues in understanding this catastrophic period in human history: the atmosphere of the Weimar Republic that gave birth to the Nazi movement, the rise to power of Hitler and the Nazis, the major aspects of the history of the Third Reich – the nature of Hitler’s rule, Nazi society, foreign policy, the Second World War and the Holocaust, and some of the efforts after the war to hold Nazis accountable for what they had done. Readings will include both primary sources in translation and secondary sources. By the end of the course students should have a good command not only of the basic narrative history of the Nazi era, but of some of the debates which it has aroused among historians and others. Students should also improve their skills in research and writing.
For History Majors
: Counts as European


HIST 40000: Historical Research (Honors)
Various Instructors
A HIST 400 project is an honors-level independent research and writing project developed while working one-on-one with a faculty member. The project must be related to a 300-level history course that the student has already taken with that professor, or will have completed prior to beginning the project. The final product of the project is usually a 30-page research paper.
To register for HIST 400, write the professor you would like to work with and determine if they are available to work with you for the next semester. Once the professor has agreed, forward that email to Ms. Adams, the History Department Administrator, at cadams@hunter.cuny.edu, and include your EMPL ID#. She will put permission for you to register into CUNY First.
Please note that there is no predefined class meeting time; instead students work out a schedule with their faculty advisor.
For History Majors: HIST 29000 is a prerequisite.


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