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Faculty

 

Sue A. Kawashima

Program Associate Head
Lecturer



Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064

The founder of the Japanese Program at Hunter, Professor Kawashima obtained her BA and MA at Columbia University and is a PhD candidate also at Columbia. Her area of concentration is Western and Japanese Art History. She has been teaching Japanese at Hunter College since 1988 to present. Her publications include A Dictionary of Japanese Particles published by Kodansha International and Oxford University Press (1999), which enjoys the reputation as one of the "Best Five" Japanese language textbooks in Japan; A Doctor in Your Pocket: Basic Medical Terms in English and Japanese co-authored by John J. Olichney, MD published by 3A Corporation (2000); Medical Communication in English and Japanese published by Nitto Sho-in (2002); and A Girl's Record, Around That Time-1935-8/15/1945 and 9/11/2001 published by Kodansha (2006), which is a World War II memoir based on her real-life experiences.

She has given lectures on world peace at Lehman College in New York, Hiroshima, Tokyo, and various other cities throughout Japan. She has served as a Committee member to select candidates for the JET (Japanese Exchange & Teaching) Program, a Japanese-government sponsored program that sends English-speaking college graduates from throughout the world to teach English in Japan.

In 2013, Professor Kawashima was awarded a Commendation by the Consul General of Japan, Ambassador Shigeyuki Hiroki, for her outstanding contributions to the field of Japanese Studies and the development of cultural exchanges and friendship between Japan and the United States.

More information here

 


 

Maayan Barkan

Program Head
Lecturer


Maayan Barkan
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
mbarkan@hunter.cuny.edu

Professor Barkan is head of the Japanese Program at Hunter. She received her MA in Japanese language education at Osaka University of Foreign Languages in Japan, and both her second MA and PhD in Linguistics at the Graduate Center of CUNY. She has received two full scholarships from the Japanese Ministry of Education, including a two-year program for her MA studies and a one-year program of Japanese language and culture studies at the same university. She passed the highest level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test. She also passed the Japan Society's Japanese language teacher training program in New York City, where she has assisted and taught privately.

 


 

Akiyo Furukawa

Adjunct Lecturer

Furukawa, Akiyo Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
afuruka@hunter.cuny.edu

Akiyo Furukawa (古川 明代)is the Associate Director of the Japanese Program at Hunter College where she has been teaching Japanese language courses since 2010. She teaches all levels, including Japanese Business Communication and Skills, Japanese Food Culture (300 level) and Japanese Pragmatics for Language Use (400 level.) She received a BA in Sociology at Hunter and an MA in Education at CCNY. She is serving as a Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program interviewer at the Consulate General of Japan. She was a volunteer member for CCI and contributed some language teaching materials. Akiyo created the courses Japanese Business Communication and Skills, Pragmatics for Language Use, Japanese Food Culture and Intermediate Japanese Composition when she received a Japan Foundation grant in 2020-2022. She expanded the program curriculum for a wider range. Akiyo is the only faculty who has taught all of the Japanese language courses.

 


 

April Goehrke

Adjunct Lecturer


April Goehrke
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
ag5532@hunter.cuny.edu

April Goehrke received her PhD in East Asian Studies from New York University, and has a background in Japanese history, cultural studies, and cultural anthropology. She studied the Japanese language at the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama after which she spent time as an exchange researcher at Waseda University in Tokyo.  April wrote her dissertation on eroguro nansensu, an art and comics movement which is the contemporary form of the mass consumer culture movement of the same name from the 1920's and 30's. She currently teaches Japanese history and a variety of Japanese culture courses throughout the CUNY system. Her research interests include contemporary Japanese culture, and the evolution of trends in mass and popular culture.

 


 

Philip Kendrick Hafferty

Adjunct Lecturer


Philip Hafferty
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
hafferty@washington.edu

Philip Hafferty received his MA in art history from the University of Washington in Seattle, where he specialized in the built environment of the Japanese Way of Tea (Chado; Tea Ceremony), and his BA in East Asian studies from Harvard University. He received a scholarship to study the Japanese language for a year at Waseda University in Tokyo, and a yearlong fellowship to immerse himself in the Urasenke Chado Tradition at the Urasenke Gakuen Professional College of Chado in Kyoto. The current Iemoto, grand master, of the Urasenke Chado Tradition awarded him his chamei tea name, Sōken, giving him status as a 2nd-degree instructor in the tradition. He has given lectures on the Way of Tea across the United States, as well as on the sea with the Holland America Cruise Line, and is currently an instructor at the Urasenke Chanoyu Center of New York. He succeeded in passing the highest level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test, and the second highest level of the Exam of the Culture of the Way of Tea (Chadō Bunka Kentei).

 


 

Emi Kikuchi

Adjunct Lecturer

Emi Kikuchi
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
ek1687@hunter.cuny.edu

Emi Kikuchi was born and raised in Ibaraki, Japan and came to the US in 1989. She received BA in Japanese Literature and teaching license of Japanese as national language and Japanese Calligraphy while in Japan.  Also, she was trained and worked as an actor and a narrator, she recorded audio for Japanese and English language textbooks. As an educator, she has taught Japanese language, calligraphy and culture at various public schools, companies and colleges in NYC and currently she is teaching Japanese language at Hunter College, The City College of New York and Nippon Club. She also teaches kimono, Japanese traditional costume, and conducts workshops and demonstrations at schools, libraries, and museums.

 


 

Mana Kobuchi

Adjunct Lecturer

Mana Kobuchi-Philip
Office: HW 1321
(212) 772-5064
mk5973@hunter.cuny.edu

Mana Kobuchi-Philip grew up in Fukuoka City, though she lived in Tokyo, where her Japanese teaching career began. Later she moved to the US, and after that the Netherlands, where she continued teaching Japanese. Along the way, she obtained an MA in TESOL from School for International Training (Brattleboro, VT), and a PhD in linguistics from CUNY graduate center. Back from Europe, she taught Japanese and linguistics at Queens College for several years, and then  joined the Hunter Japanese Program in Fall 2021.  Mana greatly enjoys teaching Japanese, as she herself is fascinated by language in general, and by Japanese in particular. If you ask her anything about Japanese grammar, she will love your questions!

 


 

Vicki Li

Adjunct Lecturer

Vicki Li
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
vk690@hunter.cuny.edu

Vicki Li is a Linguistics Ph.D. student at the CUNY - Graduate Center, studying sociolinguistics, Asian American variants of English, and Japanese Linguistics. Previously a student of Hunter College's Japanese Program herself, she now teaches Elementary Japanese as an adjunct lecturer. Her research interests include social media and media discourse which she is looking to investigate along with Japanese linguistics and Japanese culture in modern youth.

 


 

Allison Markin Powel

Adjunct Lecturer


Allison Markin Powell
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
ap7727@hunter.cuny.edu

Allison Markin Powell is a literary translator, editor, and publishing consultant.  She received the 2020 PEN America Translation Prize for The Ten Loves of Nishino by Hiromi Kawakami. She was the co-organizer and co-host of the Translating the Future conference, and is a founding member of the translator collectives Cedilla & Co. and Strong Women, Soft Power.

 


 

Mari Nakamura

Adjunct Lecturer


Mari Nakamura
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
mn1869@hunter.cuny.edu

Mari Nakamura was born in Yokohama and raised in Tokyo. She has in MA from The Ohio State University and has taught Japanese for 30 years, including at the University of Hawaii, Indiana University, Harvard University and the University of Maryland. She prepares students for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test. She has taught business people from several Fortune 500 corporations and is a published author on the topic of Japanese linguistics.

 


 

Alex Rogals

Adjunct Lecturer


Alex Rogals
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064

Alex Rogals is currently finishing his doctoral dissertation at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa on the role regionalization has played in the preservation and contemporary practice of the Japanese traditional performing art, Sagi kyōgen. He was recognized in 2017 by the Association for Asian Performance as an emerging scholar and his work has been published in the Asian Theatre Journal. Before coming to Hunter, Alex taught World Theatre, Introduction to Arts Education, and Stage directing. He also worked in arts education departments for the Geffen Playhouse and Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Los Angeles, and for Japan Society in New York. As an artist he has directed, written, and performed in theater and film productions in New York, Los Angeles, Hawai'i and Japan. Alex is deeply interested in the intersection between creativity and community, both in Japanese culture and beyond. Since coming to the Hunter Japanese Program, he has pioneered a variety of Japanese arts and culture courses which include: Japanese Contemporary Theatre, Mythology and Folklore, Japanese Horror, Animals in Japanese Culture, and Contemporary Society and Technology. Alex received his BA from Vassar College and his MFA in directing for the stage from the University of California, Los Angeles.

 


 

Kazuko Saito

Adjunct Lecturer


Kazuko Saito
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
ks2833@hunter.cuny.edu

Professor Saito is an adjunct lecturer in Japanese at CUNY. She earned her M.S. in Education from Long Island University Hudson.  She specializes in online language teaching and developed a fully online Japanese language course for Brooklyn College in 2017. She has implemented the Synchronous Online Flipped Learning Approach, or SOFLA (Marshall, 2017) into her online courses and presented her research on SOFLA at multiple international conferences and workshops. She has taught college-level Japanese online courses to students around the world. She was selected as the first-year participant in the Japan Language Exchange program by the Japan Foundation Center for the Global Partnership in 1992. She holds NYS Teaching Certificate and also teaches Japanese at a public secondary school.

 


 

Yoko Sakurai

Adjunct Lecturer


Yoko Sakurai
Office: Hunter West 1321
(212) 772-5064
ys1868@hunter.cuny.edu

Yoko Sakurai received her MA in Applied Linguistics and Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language from Ochanomizu University in Tokyo. She started her career as a Japanese teacher in Tokyo, and since 2007 she has been a Japanese lecturer at institutions in New York, including Fashion Institute of Technology, The New School and Pace University. From 2012 to 2018, she taught at The Japan Foundation in New York as a principal lecturer, and developed courses in which the Can-Do Statements-based approach was implemented. She regularly presents at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Annual Convention and other major conferences related to language education. She is also a certified ACTFL OPI (Oral Proficiency Interview) tester. One of the things she enjoys in her free time is composing haiku poetry. Her haiku won the first place at Ito-En North America New Haiku Grand Prix in 2019.

 


 

 

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